WHY NOT USING CUTTINGS OF NAVAJO GLOBE WILLOW TO REFORESTATE DRYLANDS ? – Willem VAN COTTHEM

Cuttings of Navajo Globe Willow (Salix matsudana ‘Navajo’)

by Willem Van Cotthem – University of Ghent (Belgium)

We have been setting up successful tests with drought-resistant varieties of trees to be introduced in refugee camps. We are still looking for small cuttings (20-25 cm, 8-10 inches) of the Globe Navajo willow (Salix matsudana var. ‘Navajo’).

We would be very grateful to receive some cuttings from different origins to compare drought tolerance.

Who wants to help us to some cuttings ?  Please send them to :

Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem

Beeweg 36

B9080 ZAFFELARE

A cutting of Salix matsudana in a juice bottle can be easily transplanted in the field after cutting off the bottom of the bottle, setting the basal part of the rootball free (Photo WVC 2010-01)
A cutting of Salix matsudana in a juice bottle can be easily transplanted in the field after cutting off the bottom of the bottle, setting the basal part of the rootball free (Photo WVC 2010-01)

================
‘Navajo’ is a very hardy tree, adapted to high desert climates, round-headed upright and fast-growing, spreading, large, deciduous, long lived tree, medium-sized, 20’ to 70′ tall and wide.

The tree seems to be sheared into a perfect ball. Its branching habit results in a characteristic globe shape: a broad, rounded, perfectly symmetrical crown spread of mostly fifty feet. Young 15’ tall trees start showing the rounded crown.

Slender leaves are bright green, lance-shaped, 2″-4″ long, turning yellow in fall.

Unlike most willows, this variety is popular in high desert and drylands because it is drought tolerant, adaptable to a wide range of soil conditions

The name of the ‘Navajo’ variety of the Globe Willow is probably synonym with ‘Umbraculifera’.

The Navajo Globe Willow is related to the Corkscrew willow (Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’).  Cuttings of this Cortkscrew Willow would also be welcome.

===============

Please send some cuttings to:

Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM
BEEWEG 36
B 9080 ZAFFELARE (Belgium)

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.