Container gardening at home: simple and cheap (Willem Van Cotthem / Geert VAN DAELE)

Presentation of some good examples of container gardening to produce trees, vegetables, herbs, succulents, cactus seedlings etc. at home.

Photos taken by Geert VAN DAELE.

2010-03-27 : Avocado seedlings grown in a yogurt pot and in PET-bottles. These seedlings can easily be transplanted in the soil by cutting off the bottom of the pot or bottle and put the rootball with its container directly in the plant pit. Survival rate is significantly higher. (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Avocado seedling with 3 shoots growing in a PET-bottle (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Avocado seedlings in PET-bottles and a yogurt pot (foreground). (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Avocado seedlings in small soda-bottles, a yogurt pot and taller PET-bottles. (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Seeds of dragonfruit cactus (pitaya) germinating in a blue mushroom tray, kept in a pastry box (mini-greenhouse to keep humidity high). (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Dragonfruit seedlings in a blue mushroom tray, kept in a pastry box (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27: Dragonfruit seedlings in a black plastic tray, surrounded by an ordinary plastic bag (mini-greenhouse). (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Seedlings of the tomato tree (Cyphomandra betacea) grown in plastic icecream boxes (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Seedlings of tomato tree (Cyphomandra betacea) in an icecream box. A very simple method to produce hundreds of young trees with a minimum of water (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Seedlings can be transplanted in similar cheap boxes to let them grow and harden off before planting in the soil (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Cuttings of Navajo willow (Salix matsudana ‘Navajo’) rooting in icetea and coca-cola plastic bottles. Background: avocado seedlings in a yogurt pot, an icetea bottle and larger PET-bottles (Photo Geert VAN DAELE)
2010-03-27 : Navajo willow cuttings rooting in small plastic bottles, otherwise littered. After full development of the rootball, when roots start curling at the bottom, the lower part of the bottle is cut off, setting the lower part of the rootball free. Then, the tree seedling is planted in a plant pit in the soil, leaving the rest of the plastic bottle around the rootball as a protective layer limiting evaporation. Roots will develop swiftly in the soil and the plastic bottle will slowly desintegrate. Survival rate is significantly higher (Photo Geeert VAN DAELE)

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.