Grow your own produce (Google / TCPalm)

Read at : Google Alert – container gardening

http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2011/apr/14/excited-about-earth-day-contain-yourself/

Grow your own produce, and save money, with container gardening

By Angela Smith

Richard Anthony and Marleen Andrews look over their vegetable container garden in Vero Beach. Anthony has been gardening for more than 30 years and a master gardener for five years. He’s able to grow a variety of vegetables throughout the year depending on the season.

When Earth Day started more than 40 years, getting people to just think about the environment was a big step.

Then came the big push for recycling.

These days, it seems like there’s a green, sustainable or eco-friendly option for just about everything.

Maybe you already reduce, reuse and recycle. You already choose chemical-free cleaners. You already landscape with native plants that require minimal watering.

What else can you do this Earth Day, April 22?

You could try growing some of your own food.

Don’t scoff. Even if you’re known not to have a green thumb or don’t have a tilled corner of your yard, you can grow your own vegetables with container gardening.

“Anyone can do it,” said master gardener Richard Anthony of Vero Beach. “It’s simple, it’s not time-consuming. All it takes once the plants are started is daily watering and a little nutrition once in a while. Then, just sit back on your patio and watch it grow.”

Anthony, like other container gardeners, also is reaping the financial benefit of growing his own produce.

“The truth is when you take a look at some of the prices that you’re getting for produce today it’s actually shocking. So I thought it’s time to do something about it,” Anthony said. “When you go out and spend $4 on a head of broccoli — it’s out of sight.”

And what to do with the scraps after you reap and eat your harvest?

Why, in true Earth Day spirit, throw them on a compost pile to add life to the soil in your containers.

GETTING STARTED

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.