Container gardens are an age-old concept (Google / Deccan Herald)

Using icecream trays for seedling production and plastic bottle to produce avocado seedlings on my windowsills in wintertime (Photo WVC)

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Read at : Google Alert – container gardening

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/167688/creativity-container-gardens.html

Creativity with container gardens

A Dyuti

No space in your apartment for a garden? Your outdoor garden looks hackneyed? Wondering how to spruce up that bare balcony? Longing for a fresh supply of herbs and vegetables daily within hand’s reach? Don’t despair. Go for container gardens!

Sure, pots and planters are used to grow pretty flowers lining window-sills, porches, patios and balconies.

But, have you ever thought of unleashing your creativity to raise lovely flowers and fruits and vegetables besides aromatic herbs in containers of different shapes, sizes, materials and hues? Sounds utopian? Not really. Container gardens are an age-old concept – whether as stand-alone or in conjunction with a regular garden, indoor or outdoor, aesthetic or functional.

The greatest advantage of container gardening, however, is that you can grow plants anywhere, rearrange them often for novelty, have themed landscaping with relative ease and flaunt your creativity through choice of colourful and artistic containers.

Curious? Read on. First, the types of plants you can grow in containers – flowers (seas­onal/perennial) like geraniums, begonias, petunias…foliage plants like coleus, vines/creepers, succulents like aloe, cacti, fruits, vegetables (toma­toes/potatoes/cucumbers…) and herbs.

Shrubs and trees too, if the containers are large and robust enough! What you can actually grow depends on whether the sunlight available is in tandem with your particular plant’s needs. Or, expose the plants to sunlight for the required time in a different sunny spot and post-sunbath, repopulate their original location.

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A collection of bottles and trays that will be used for plant production at home (Photo Martine Daubremé)

 

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.