The Aerogarden (How to Grow Plants Indoors)

Read at :

http://www.howtogrowplantsindoors.com/growing-plants-indoors/container-gardening-indoors-using-the-aerogarden/

Container Gardening Indoors Using the Aerogarden

Indoor container gardening has been around for decades and maybe longer. It very popular among those looking for hassle free gardening. Herbs, vegetables and flowers can now add beauty and aroma to your home while you grow a beautiful garden that requires minimal effort on your part. Thanks to the invention of the Aerogarden, we can have a
fresh harvest year round.

An Aerogarden is a soil free method of growing plants which delivers the perfect amount of air, water, light, and nutrients to your garden. Because there is no soil, the root system grows in fertilized water with no risk of soil borne diseases or common pests.

Seeds are placed in a water-permeable material similar to a sponge. The sponge is then suspended above the reservoir which contains a mixture of fresh water and a nutrient solution. At various intervals during the day, a computerized pump floods the sponge material containing the seeds or plant. The excess water flows back to the reservoir. The water will then be recirculated so that the plant will continuously be watered.

The Aerogarden has a built in adjustable grow light. You can set the time the light needs to come on and it will automatically come on at the same time each morning and go off at the same time each night.

An indicator light will come on and let you know when to add water and nutrients. Everything else is automatic and requires little attention. Recently Aerogarden has released some very creative models in a variety of colors, animal shapes and other artistic designs. There is one that will fit in with almost any decor.

I purchased my first Aerogarden from The Official Aerogarden Store at http://www.aerogardenstore.com in 2006 and later purchased another at a local thrift store and still another on Craigs List.

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.