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Growing vegetables in containers

Photo credit: Container Gardening Pedia

Vegetable container gardening, its advantages and requirements

Most of us are passionate about growing our own vegetables in our backyard but sad to say not many have the space or the facility to cultivate a traditional vegetable garden. Space is a big constraint and with urbanisation at its peak now hardly any of us live in farm lands; most of us have moved to the bustling city centres into smaller apartments or dwelling places. Undeterred by the space constraint people with a passion for gardening are taking up vegetable container gardening to satiate their desire to grow their own veggies.

Advantages of pursuing vegetable container gardening

Leaving aside the advantages, vegetable container gardening is actually so much of a fun activity that many of us enjoy. This activity keeps us fruitfully engaged providing good physical exercise too. It is one good way to de stress and it relaxes the mind.

Growing vegetables in containers is pretty challenging and you feel quite a thrill when you pluck fresh organic vegetables grown in your own home.

When you use good soil enriched with organic compost and sow organic tomato seedlings your tomatoes are totally an organic produce which you feel proud to deliver to your family. Now a days there is a big thrust on having everything organically made without using chemicals that could cause us a lot of harm and result in health hazards. Home grown organic vegetables ensure that your health and the health of your family is safe guarded.

Use of pesticide is another thing that can harm us no end; but with organic tomato container gardening the use of chemical pesticides is avoided instead natural pesticides are used that keep away pests at the same time do not cause us any harm.

Essentials for vegetable container gardening

Read the full article: Container Gardening Pedia

 

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.