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Roof farms and vertical farms

Photo credit: Treehugger

Green roof at Toronto’s Mountain Equipment Coop (credit: Suzanne Jesperson)

Green roofs, living walls and vertical farms are all morphing into living green buildings

by Lloyd Alter (@lloydalter)
Design / Green Architecture

21 photos

EXCERPT

The green roof installed at Toronto’s Mountain Equipment Coop in 1998 it was one of the first of its kind- the extensive lightweight planting of low-maintenance, smaller native plants. It was not designed to be looked at; the only way you can get to it is via a ladder and a roof hatch, and the only people who can see it are in the new condos surrounding the store now. It was a nice touch, but nobody knew what a revolution in building design it was the start of.

Livging walls - credit SPARK - http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2015/03/spark-1.jpg.0x545_q100_crop-scale.jpg
Living walls – credit SPARK – http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2015/03/spark-1.jpg.0x545_q100_crop-scale.jpg

There really is no reason that ground, walls, balconies and roofs cannot all feed us, provide habitat for wildlife, shade and cool our buildings, and provide feedstock for our furnaces and electrical generators. There is no reason that our own waste can’t be digested on site and provide compost for the farm. There is no reason that our buildings cannot provide employment for people living in them, growing the food that others in the building can then have for dinner.

This is the future of green living building, it’s not walls, roofs or garden; it’s everywhere.

Read the full article: Treehugger

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.