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Vegetables in a container at home

Photo credit: Google

Homegrown: Choosing containers to grow veggies

BY CAROL STEIN AND DEBBIE MOOSE

Vegetables in container - http://www.newsobserver.com/living/home-garden/txg596/picture15343526/ALTERNATES/FREE_960/LIFE_GARDEN-FALL-COLORS_8_BZ.jpg
Vegetables in container – http://www.newsobserver.com/living/home-garden/txg596/picture15343526/ALTERNATES/FREE_960/LIFE_GARDEN-FALL-COLORS_8_BZ.jpg

In a perfect world, every home would have an ideal spot for a vegetable garden with plenty of sun, loose rich soil that’s not too dry and not too wet, and no weeds.

If you find that Eden, let us know, because it doesn’t exist in our yards. Debbie deals with limited sun and acidic clay soil. Carol has dry sandy soil and rampant wiregrass. And neither of us is the proverbial spring chicken any more, meaning that stooping, heavy digging and bending can lead to sore backs.

There’s a creative, easy and beautiful solution: Containers.

Plastic and terra-cotta pots are fine, but think beyond those and you can give your yard a boost with plantings that are both attractive and edible. Container gardening is also more friendly to those with back problems or arthritis.

Almost any size or shape item will work – if it will hold dirt, you can grow in it. Try rusty red wagons, worn-out wheelbarrows, galvanized metal washtubs or wooden barrels. Still have rectangular plastic recycling bins around? Those are great for growing leafy greens, carrots or beets. Remodeling? Save that old bathtub for gardening. Carol has even planted herbs in old pairs of galoshes.

Read the full article: The News&Observer

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.