What a difference a year or two makes!

 

Temperatures, watering times down this year

By Rodd Moesel

This year we have yet to reach 100 degrees and have been blessed with regular refreshing and thirst-quenching rains.

What a difference a year or two makes! In recent years at this time, we had already experienced triple digit heat several times and had been watering regularly to beat a punishing drought.

This year we have yet to reach 100 degrees and have been blessed with regular refreshing and thirst-quenching rains that have dramatically reduced how much time we have had to spend watering to grow and sustain our trees, shrubs, gardens and lawns.

Normally we would slow down on planting at this time of the year and focus on mulching, watering and trying to support or sustain the crops we have already planted. With the extra moisture in our top and sub soils and the milder conditions this year, you can still experience great success planting container-grown trees, shrubs, annuals, perennials and even warm-season vegetables as long as you will be faithful and dependable in watering when needed between our natural rains.

This is prime container gardening season as many folks are spending more time outside on the patio, the front porch or in their back yards. You may be entertaining guests and want to dress up your apartment, condo or home with the extra color and excitement of live plants. Container gardens give you two opportunities to make a design statement. One is with the container you select. It can be anything from a traditional black nursery container to a decorative terra cotta or other color plastic or foam pot. It can be a whisky barrel, an old wash tub, a wheelbarrow or other imaginative container that can hold soil.

The big issues that affect container gardening success are the size of the container and how much soil it can hold, drainage holes for water to escape from the container and the quality of soil used in the container.

Read the full article: News OK

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.