Container gardening in every work plan for combatting malnutrition in the next decade.

 

 

MALNUTRITION AND CONTAINER GARDENING

by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

(University of Ghent, Belgium)

On Sept. 20, 2016, FAO’s Director-General José Graziano da Silva addressed the United Nations General Assembly celebrating the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition. and said:

“The 10 years running until 2025 will be a critical time for action to build healthy and sustainable food systems and end malnutrition in all its forms. The purpose of the Decade of Action on Nutrition is to continue to draw the world`s attention to the importance of combatting malnutrition”.

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Jojo ROM and his family (Davao City, The Philippines) harvesting a daily portion of fresh vegetables and herbs at the riser in his small backyard. All is growing in different types of containers (bottles, tetrapots, etc.) – Photo Jojo Rom 285968_2051946656569_1181604134_31935796_8041270_o.jpg

Knowing that CONTAINER GARDENING is one of the most effective tools for combatting malnutrition at home and in schools, the 71.000 members of this group are wondering if container gardening is really a part of the work plan of WHO and FAO, focusing their efforts on two main objectives: “One is assisting governments in building national policies and programs that advance nutrition. The other is to align the efforts of existing global initiatives and social movements towards common goals. To support concrete action on nutrition programs, both agencies will further organize special meetings to strengthen countries’ technical capacities to tackle new nutrition challenges”.

Am I blind or have I missed container gardening somewhere ?

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Juicy lettuce growing in a kiddle pool, but it can also been growing in any container (pot, bottle, bag, sack, drum, tower of bottles or buckets, etc. – Photo Sonia Alejandra Gauthier – 483968_4316875042333_1291165749_n.jpg

It remains good to know that more and people on all continents are growing fresh food for daily consumption in a panoply of containers. It is a recognisable signal for governments and international aid organizations that this is the most direct road to solving the malnutrition problem, particularly for children.

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.