Caring for mandevilla, bougainvillea

 

Photo credit: Google

The bushy, vigorous habit of Sun Parasol Pretty Pink mandevilla tropical vine makes it ideal for growing in containers.

CAROL LINK: How to care for mandevilla, bougainvillea

Each spring, Oscar situates a large container filled with a beautiful, pink-flowering mandevilla vine along the driveway near the side entrance to our home. Years ago, I placed a 3-foot, lightweight metal trellis in the container. With a small amount of assistance from me, the vine climbs the trellis throughout the spring and summer. Occasionally, I pick up a stray tendril and wind the vine through the trellis. Throughout the growing season, the beautiful vine decorates our landscape and hummingbirds zoom in, butterflies flutter in and bees buzz in to enjoy the lovely pink flowers.

Mandevilla vines are sensitive to the cold, so in this area, all mandevilla plants should be brought inside and stored for the winter. Because our personal mandevilla plant grows in a large container, Oscar recently used a set of hand trucks to roll the container into the garage for the winter. I will apply a small amount of water to the container about once each month until spring. That’s all that’s necessary, because the plant will soon be going dormant, and applying too much water during the winter could cause root rot.

Next spring, after the last predicted frost, we will move the container back outside, situate the plant in full sun, cut the vine back to about 1 foot in length, apply fertilizer and then keep the plant watered well. Once again, the plant will grow rapidly and very soon the vine will be climbing the trellis, and in due time, beautiful pink blossoms will once again dangle from the vine.

bougainvillea-on-fence
This is a terracotta pot holding a bougainvillea – http://www.texasmornings.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/bougainvillea-on-fence.jpg

A bougainvillea vine is treated in much the same manner as a mandevilla.

 

Read the full story: Houmatoday

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.

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