Reducing fertilizer waste and maximizing plant production in containers

Photo credit: Pixabay

Boxwood (Buxus sempervirens)

Species-specific fertilization can benefit container nursery crop production

by Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

in Canadian Journal of Plant Science, 10.4141/cjps-2014-340

ABSTRACT

To determine the responses of six container-grown shrub species to different controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) application rates, plant growth and root-zone traits were evaluated following fertilization with Polyon® 16–6–13, 5–6 month CRF incorporated at 0.60, 0.89, 1.19, 1.49 and 1.79 kg m−3 N.

The six species tested at a southwestern Ontario, Canada, nursery were Cornus stolonifera ‘Flaviramea’ (yellow-twig dogwood), Euonymus alatus ‘Compactus’ (dwarf winged euonymus), Hydrangea paniculata ‘Grandiflora’ (Pee Gee hydrangea), Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Nugget’ (Nugget ninebark), Spiraea japonica ‘Magic Carpet’ (Magic Carpet spirea), Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’ (Wine and Roses weigela).

Different species responded differently to the CRF rates applied. For the majority of species at the final harvest, growth index, plant height, canopy area, leaf area and above-ground dry weight were greater in high vs. low CRF rates; however, different species had different optimal CRF application rates or ranges: 1.49 kg m−3 N for Hydrangea and Spiraea, 1.19 kg m−3 N for Weigela, 1.19 to 1.49 kg m−3 N for Cornus and Physocarpus, and ≤0.60 kg m−3 N for Euonymus.

Based on these species-specific optimal fertilizer rates or ranges, growers can group plant species with similar fertilizer demands, thereby reducing fertilizer waste and maximizing plant production.

Organic fertilizer (Google / Home and Garden)

VIDEO seen at : Google Alert – container gardening

http://thegardeningsite.homeandgarden-101.com/featured-videos/container-gardening-organic-fertilizer/

Container Gardening organic fertilizer

Chris container gardening herbs and vegetables of the project and organic fertilizers are used. Feed your plants on a weekly basis is the key to a great harvest. Treat your garden or small container large edible landscape as a small farm. Maximize your food production to ensure optimal foraging. You will have fun, learn new information and produce very good tasting food, you save money.

VERMICOMPOST : nutrient-rich fertilizer from manure (Science Daily / Am. Soc. Hort. Sci.)

Read at :

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091210153701.htm

Vermicompost from Pig Manure Grows Healthy Hibiscus

ScienceDaily (Dec. 17, 2009) — Vermicomposting, the practice of using earthworms to turn waste into nutrient-rich fertilizer, can be an economical, organic waste management practice. During vermicomposting, earthworms and microorganisms stabilize organic waste in an aerobic, moist environment. The resulting product, called vermicompost (VC), or worm castings, provides commercial and amateur growers an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional substrate additives for producing many varieties of container-grown plants. A research team recently experimented with pine bark amended with vermicompost derived from pig manure to see if this organic alternative can produce healthy hibiscus. Continue reading VERMICOMPOST : nutrient-rich fertilizer from manure (Science Daily / Am. Soc. Hort. Sci.)

Human Hair Combined With Compost Is Good Fertilizer For Plants (Science Daily)

Read at : Science Daily

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081229104704.htm

Human Hair Combined With Compost Is Good Fertilizer For Plants

ScienceDaily (Dec. 31, 2008) — Agricultural crop production relies on composted waste materials and byproducts, such as animal manure, municipal solid waste composts, and sewage sludge, as a necessary nutrient source. Studies have shown that human hair, a readily available waste generated from barbershops and hair salons, combined with additional compost, is an additional nutrient source for crops.

Although human hair has become commercially available to crop producers in the past couple years, it has not been proven to be an exclusive source of nutrients in greenhouse container production. Continue reading Human Hair Combined With Compost Is Good Fertilizer For Plants (Science Daily)

The big top ten organic gardening tips (Google / Beautiful Home and Garden)

Read at : Google Alert – gardening

http://beautifulhomegarden.blogspot.com/2008/09/big-top-ten-organic-gardening-tips.html

The big top ten organic gardening tips

By using only organic gardening supplies, your gardening tasks will be easier and more enjoyable.• Compost, an all natural soil amendment is made through the use of composters. Composters break down organic materials such as leaves, grass clippings, and food scraps to make a 100% organic, all natural soil additive. Composters come in varying shapes, sizes and designs. Research composters and choose one that meets your needs. Making your own natural compost is a great alternative to other organic gardening supplies you would ordinarily have to buy, and it’s free!

• Rain Barrels collect water from your roof and store it until needed. Rain water is softer and chemical free. Rain Barrels are great for keeping your plants healthy and saving water. Many rain barrels are made from reused food drums and recycled plastic, keeping with the commitment to sustainable living. You can collect approximately 675 gallons of rain off your roof from a single rain storm. Stored rain water supplies much needed moisture to your gardens during extreme dry spells where rationing is necessary.

• All Natural and organic fertilizers supplies much needed nutrients to plantings. Natural and organic fertilizers generally have a slow release so nutrients last over time. Natural and organic fertilizers such as liquefied worm poop and tea from composters, are among the top natural and organic fertilizers and an essential ingredient to your organic gardening supplies.

• Push reel mowers are a great way to be eco friendly! Push reel mowers use no gas or electric, only your own energy. Push reel mowers are lightweight, easy to use and gives your lawn that golf course look. Owning a push reel mower is an important part of organic gardening.

• Grow native plants. Native plants require less water. They are also naturally more insect and disease resistant than other plants. Healthy, lush gardens made from indigenous plants also make a natural home for birds.

Container gardening is good for planting your favorite flowers and vegetables when space is limited! Use large containers such as steel buckets and wooden barrels for creative container gardening. Container gardens do not require a lot of organic material due to being enclosed. Many gardening containers such as green pots are all natural, made from all natural elements such as rice hulls and coconut fiber.

• Using only natural and organic gardening supplies such as Insecticidal Soap, Horticultural Oil or Organic Disease Control will keep your garden healthy, naturally. Organic gardening supplies leave no hazardous residue and break down naturally into the soil. Natural predators such as bats, praying mantis and ladybugs are great organic insect controls. Bat boxes are effective for keeping bats nearby and supplies shelter through the harsh winter months. Enjoying and benefiting from organic gardening is dependent upon the use of the highest quality organic gardening supplies.

• Mulch your flowerbeds and vegetable garden to retain moisture around plants. Mulch supplies your plants with much needed moisture throughout hot, sunny days. Mulching also keeps weeds away. Apply all natural worm poop fertilizer around plantings when mulching. Your organic garden will love you for it. • Create a bird habitat by placing bird houses, birdbaths and bird feeders in your yard. Birds are fun to watch and will control the insect population in a natural way. Pick a quiet section of your yard to keep a variety of birding supplies to attract birds of your choice. Bird food such as sunflower hearts and suet are great treats. • Whether you are working on your lawn, flowerbed or vegetable garden, have fun. Remember, all natural supplies will make organic gardening easier and more enjoyable. The following is a list of recommended all natural and organic gardening supplies: composter, rain barrels, organic fertilizers, push reel mower, natural gardening containers, birding supplies, natural homemade compost, These are the best equipment, tools and supplies for keeping your plants, turf and environment healthy.

Happy Gardening!

This article may be reproduced and/or distributed. This article was written by Mark & Vera Pappas, Co-owners of http://www.greennationgardens.com/?Click=23GreenNationGardens.com, suppliers of unique and eco-friendly garden supplies.

Indian organic fertilizer stimulates vegetables and flowers (Willem)

My Indian correspondent Yogesh PATEL has sent a sample of an Indian organic fertilizer. My friends of the Allotment Gardens Park Slotenkouter in B9040 ST. AMANDSBERG (GHENT, Belgium) have set up a number of small trials in which it was clearly shown that this organic fertilizer has a very positive effect on plant growth (vegetables and flowers).

Here are a number of pictures taken today, June 19th, 2008. One can compare with earlier postings on this blog and on

http://desertification.wordpress.com
http://secheresse.wordpress.com (French)
http://zadenvoorleven.wordpress.com (Dutch, with chapters in different languages)

2008-07-19 : Garden of Anne-Marie ROGIERS – Trial on dwarf beans – Left : 2 rows of beans planted earlier – Center : 1 row of control plants (smaller, yellowish) – Right : 1 row of treated beans (somewhat taller and greener).

2008-07-19 : Garden of Anne-Marie ROGIERS – Trial on dwarf beans – Left : 2 rows of beans planted earlier – Center : 1 row of control plants (smaller, yellowish) – Right : 1 row of treated beans (somewhat taller and greener).

2008-07-19 : Garden of André D’HOOGHE – Trial on 2 rows of leek plants – Foreground : First meter : treated plants – Background : untreated (control). Small benefit 2 weeks after treatment.


2008-07-19 : Garden of André D’HOOGHE – Trial on 2 rows of leek plants – Foreground : First meter : treated plants – Background : untreated (control). Small benefit 2 weeks after treatment.

2008-07-19 : Garden of Eddy – Trial on Pelargonium pots. Plants were in very bad condition before treatment. Remarkable change in a short period : plants started flowering luxuriously.

2008-07-19 : Garden of André ROMBAUT – Trial on endives (broadleaved plants in the center) – Foreground (first half of the 2 rows) : treated endives much taller and leaves broader. Background : untreated endives (control) smaller and leaves narrower. Observation : the Tagetes plants, left of the treated endives, and the carrot plants, right of the treated endives at the foreground also profited from Yogesh PATEL’s fertilizer, growing remarkably taller than the control plants at the background.


2008-07-19 : Garden of André ROMBAUT – Trial on endives (broadleaved plants in the center) – Foreground (first half of the 2 rows) : treated endives much taller and leaves broader. Background : untreated endives (control) smaller and leaves narrower. Observation : the Tagetes plants, left of the treated endives, and the carrot plants, right of the treated endives at the foreground also profited from Yogesh PATEL’s fertilizer, growing remarkably taller than the control plants at the background.

2008-07-19 : Garden of André ROMBAUT – Central part of the picture : Trial on small beans – Foreground : treated beans (significantly taller, having more flowers) – Background : untreated beans smaller, with less flowers. Difference in production of beans will be measured later.


2008-07-19 : Garden of André ROMBAUT – Central part of the picture : Trial on small beans – Foreground : treated beans (significantly taller, having more flowers) – Background : untreated beans smaller, with less flowers. Difference in production of beans will be measured later.

New observations on PATEL’s fertilizer (Willem)

On June 21st, 2008, I posted a message called “Effect of a new Indian organic fertilizer”. That fertilizer was sent to me by my Indian correspondent Yogesh PATEL. Some friends of the allotment gardens Slotenkouter in 9040 ST.AMANDSBERG (Belgium) are testing the fertilizer on different vegetables.

That message showed the first pictures of the very positive effect on the growth of carrots.

2008-06-21 : Edward VUEGHS in his nice allotment garden, showing the effect of PATEL-fertilizer on carrots.

2008-06-21 : Four rows of carrots sown the same day. A few weeks later the soil along the rows was treated from left to right as follows :

Row 1 and Row 2 (left) : carrots treated with a mixture of 4kg of PATEL-fertilizer per 80 kg of local garden soil.
Row 3 (center) : carrots untreated, growing in local, quite fertile garden soil.
Row 4 (right) : carrots treated with a mixture of 2 kg of PATEL-fertilizer per 80 kg of local garden soil.

See the remarkable difference in growth and this only 14 days after treatment.

2008-06-21 : Row 1 and Row 2 (left) : carrots treated with a mixture of 4kg of PATEL-fertilizer per 80 kg of local garden soil.
Row 3 (center) : carrots untreated, growing in local, quite fertile garden soil.
Row 4 (right) : carrots treated with a mixture of 2 kg of PATEL-fertilizer per 80 kg of local garden soil.

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TWO WEEKS LATER …

Two weeks later, on July 2nd, 2008, new observations in some allotment gardens confirmed the positive effect of PATEL’s fertilizer on plant growth (carrots, beans, Pelargonium in hanging pots). Here are some pictures showing that effect :


2008-07-02 : Pelargonium flowering in hanging pots. The cabin owner declared that his Pelargoniums were in rather bad condition when he applied a handful of a mixture of 80 kg local soil and 4 kg of PATEL’s fertilizer. Two weeks later they are luxuriously flowering.

2008-07-02 : Edward VUEGHS inspecting growth differences of his carrots. Compare with the first picture above, taken 2 weeks earlier.

2008-07-02 : Row 1 and Row 2 (left) : carrots treated with a mixture of 4kg of PATEL-fertilizer per 80 kg of local garden soil.
Row 3 (center) : carrots untreated, growing in local, quite fertile garden soil.
Row 4 (right) : carrots treated with a mixture of 2 kg of PATEL-fertilizer per 80 kg of local garden soil.


Remarkable stimulation of carrot growth with PATEL’s fertilizer : two lines left with full dosage, one line center without fertilizer (control), one line right with half dosage.

2008-07-02 : Edward VUEGHS and André ROMBAUT, owner of this allotment garden, observing two rows of beans, divided into two parts : to the foreground the untreated beans (control), to the background the treated beans.

2008-07-02 : Foreground : control beans in local soil. Background : beans treated with PATEL’s fertilizer, the double in volume.

2008-07-02 : Bean plants treated with PATEL’s fertilizer (background) are taller (almost the double), and darker green.

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Additional observations will be made during the next weeks and a final report on the effect of this new Indian fertilizer will be presented.