Some drought advice (Google / 31Night.com)

Read at : Google Alert – container gardening

http://www.31night.com/2011/11/gardening-by-way-of-a-drought-or-how-to-sprinkle-your-water-properly/

Gardening By way of A Drought Or How To Sprinkle Your Water Properly

Posted by DoxieDagrella710

So you find yourself in the midst of the worst drought inside residing reminiscence and your backyard occupants are beginning to sag, flag and wilt. Which vegetation ought to be watered first and which vegetation should receive the main quantities of the irrigation? You start to really feel like the leader of a third world nation making an attempt to spread your counties meagre price range throughout healthcare, military and education. By no means worry, let me dampen your worries with some drought advice.

First to receive the H2O

Latest plantings are high of the list for normal watering, if water is available. New plantings such as naked-root timber or shrubs planted the earlier autumn / winter, with newly planted perennials also at nice danger from drought damage. You see these new plantings haven’t had a lot time to produce water-searching for roots, the type of roots that journey deep and large for moisture. Because of this, we should complement the plants pure water supply. Throughout a hosepipe ban, recent plantings of annual bedding summer time bedding resembling marigolds, impatiens, Nicotiana etc needs to be considered probable casualties of the water war. If I had a limited supply of water to divide between a Japanese maple and some annual bedding, I’m afraid the maple would obtain the lions share and to hell with the bedding. As a rule of thumb, if the soil 5cm (2 inches) beneath the grounds floor is dry, then it is time to water. The next is short checklist of plants can cope with a brief period of drought, as soon as established. Brachyglottis, Corokia, Gleditsia, Halimiocistus, and Hippophae.

Container crops during a drought

Subsequent on the water-receiving checklist are containerised plants, hanging baskets and window boxes. Primarily a containerised plant is growing above the ground water desk, with simply the soil inside the container to offer the required moisture. If the moisture is not inside the container, then I’m afraid the roots have nowhere else to go to quench the vegetation thirst. Once more, if the compost 5cm (2 inches) below the pots surface is dry, then it is time to water, it is up to the gardener to supply that water when required. Attempt to provide a catch plate or tray beneath containers, these “catchers” will comprise any extra water that can eventually be absorbed in the compost. Remember that terracotta and other porous container supplies soak up a very good amount of water that the plant is then unable to access. The following is a short record of container bedding plants that can deal with a brief period of drought, once established. Arctotis, Lantana, Plectranthus, Portulaca and Zinnia

(continued)

TERRACOTTEM soil conditioner : an experiment in Togo (Vicoire de Jésus Olympio / Willem Van Cotthem)

SUMMARY

REPORT ON TERRACOTTEM SOIL CONDITIONER EXPERIMENT

LOMé (TOGO)

Sister Victoire de Jésus Olympio

TEXTE FRANçAIS (TRANSLATION SEE BELOW)

L’expérience du TerraCottem a duré un mois. Nous avons utilisé un légume africain (adémè), dont je ne connais pas son nom en Français (WVC: pourpier, Portulaca oleracea). Ce légume sert à préparer la sauce.

L’expérience a été réalisée dans le quartier de Hédzranawoé à Lomé (TOGO). Nous sommes dans un quartier où l’eau est très profond dans le sol. Dans notre centre nous avons un forage, mais l’eau est salée et notre terre est très pauvre selon le résultat d’analyses qui ont été effectué en Italie. Or, nous avons constaté que le TerraCottem peut valablement remédier à notre problème en améliorant notre culture.

La graine semée avec TerraCottem mesure 77 cm dans l’espace d’un mois et celle semée sans TerraCottem (témoin) mesure 15 cm, soit 62 cm de différence. C’est un résultat excellent.

Malheureusement, nous n’avons pas les moyens pour acheter ce produit un peu trop cher pour notre bourse.

Merci à monsieur Willem Van Cotthem pour ce don.

============

2001-04 : Purslane treated with soil conditioner TerraCottem (Photo Victoire de Jésus Olympio)

The experiment with TerraCottem took one month.  We used an african vegetable (adémè), of which I don’t know the French name (WVC : pourpier, Portulaca oleracea , purslane).  This vegetable is used to prepare the sauce.

2001-04 : Purslane treated with soil conditioner TerraCottem (Photo Victoire de Jésus Olympio)

The experiment is carried out in the district of Hédezranawoé in Lomé (TOGO).  We are in a district where the water table in the soil is very deep.  In our center, we have a well, but the water is saline and the soil is very poor, according to the analyses done in Italy.  Well, we have observed that the soil conditioner TerraCottem can significantly solve our problem, improving our production.

2001-04 : Purslane not treated with soil conditioner TerraCottem = control plants (Photo Victoire de Jésus Olympio)

Seeds treated with TerraCottem grew up to 7 cm within a month and seeds growing in a soil without TerraCottem (control plants) grew up to 15 cm only, on average a difference of 62 cm.

2001-04 : Purslane not treated with soil conditioner TerraCottem = control plants (Photo Victoire de Jésus Olympio)

This is an excellent result.

2001-04 : Difference in purslane production with and without soil conditioner TerraCottem (Photo Victoire de Jésus Olympio)

Unfortunately, we do not have the financial resources to buy this soil conditioner, too expensive for our purse.

Thanks to Mr. Willem van Cotthem for this donation.

Customers planted drought-tolerant landscapes in their front yards (Google / Press-Telegram)

Read at : Google Alert – drought

http://www.presstelegram.com/news/ci_16271782

 

Incentives for drought resistant front yards called a success

 

By Pamela Hale-Burns, Staff Writer

 

LONG BEACH – The Long Beach Water Department presented its 100th Lawn-to-Garden resident Wednesday.

In April, the Beautiful Long Beach Lawn-to-Garden Incentive Program allowed pre-approved water customers to apply for $2.50-per-square-foot rebates, with a set maximum of 1,000 square feet allowed per customer.

Customers then planted drought-tolerant landscapes in their front yards, which, over time, will help conserve water.

“This program, the City’s Beautiful Long Beach Lawn-to-Garden Incentive Program, is a program that’s designed to encourage and reward Long Beach residents and businesses for using less water outside their homes and businesses,” said 2nd District Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal, who is also the City’s representative on the Metropolitan Water District Board.

Lowenthal and other officials were touting the success of the incentives at the home of Alan Phair, in the 2100 block of East Sixth Street; Phair used the program to help transform his front lawn with drought-resistant plants over the course of three months.

Although the city had budgeted for 100 residents, there were over 400 applicants, said Kevin Wattier, general manager of the Long Beach Water Department.

“Congratulations to the City of Long Beach for their leadership on water conservation,” said Mark Gold, president of Heal the Bay. “You don’t see too often a city take this degree of leadership.”

(continued)

Drought Tolerant Perennials (Suite101)

Read at :

http://landscaping.suite101.com/article.cfm/plant-drought-tolerant-perennials-to-reduce-landscape-maintenance

Plant Drought Tolerant Perennials to Reduce Landscape Maintenance

Low maintenance landscapes looks great despite the weather. To create one, design a garden featuring flowers that thrive in dry soil and hot sun.

A garden that laughs in the face of dry summer days begins with good plant choices. Most drought tolerant perennials grow beautifully in a range of conditions—they’ll thrive in evenly moist, well-drained soil but also tolerate and continue to bloom during droughts.

Fortunately, it’s not hard to find many drought tolerant perennials at garden centers. Start with the list here, but also read plant labels and ask garden personnel for suggestions. Local botanical gardens and Cooperative Extension Service offices also usually have lists of plants that tolerate dry conditions.

Keep in mind that untended spots in garden center display plantings or in parks or other public areas also can be a great source for ideas. Especially in dry weather, if you see perennials that are thriving without much apparent attention, try to identify them. They may make excellent additions to your garden.

Perennials for Dry Soils

Give all of these plants full sun and well-drained soil.

Amsonia (Amsonia spp.) ………………………………

Blue false indigo (Baptisia australis). …………………………..

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea). ………………………………..

Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia). ……………………………….

Shasta daisies (Chrysanthemum × superbum). ……………………………

Thread-leaved coreopsis (Coreopsis verticillata). ……………………….

Yarrow (Achillea spp.). ………………………………

Read on

Smart plant choices are at the heart of any waterwise landscape. Successful water saving landscapes also use site selection and initial care to make sure plants thrive.

Water Wise Garden Care

(continued)

UN AND PARTNERS SEEK $34 MILLION TO ASSIST DROUGHT-STRICKEN GUATEMALANS (UNNews)

Read at : UNNews

UN AND PARTNERS SEEK $34 MILLION TO ASSIST DROUGHT-STRICKEN GUATEMALANS

New York, Mar  5 2010  2:05PM

The United Nations, together with the Guatemalan Government and aid partners, today launched a $34 million appeal to counter food shortages affecting 2.7 million people living in the Central American country’s so-called ‘dry corridor,’ which even before last year’s drought had one of the highest rates of chronic malnutrition in the world.  The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (<“http://ochaonline.un.org/”>OCHA) said today’s appeal will complement national relief efforts and provide support for food, health, nutrition, agriculture and early recovery, as well as water, sanitation and hygiene projects for six months for some 680,000 people living in departments in the eastern section of the country, including the dry corridor – Jutiapa, Santa Rosa, Zacapa, Chiquimula, El Progreso and Baja Verapaz – and the neighbouring Izabal and Quiché. Global acute malnutrition among children under the age of five in the dry corridor and the two neighbouring provinces is at 11 per cent, and at 13 per cent among women of child-bearing age. Both figures are above the emergency threshold of 10 per cent.  The dry corridor had faced annual food shortages before, but this year, the situation is exacerbated by a combination of bad weather and bad economics.

El Niño-affected rainfall patterns in the country lead to high losses in hillside and subsistence agricultural production.

Meanwhile, rising food prices brought on by the global economic crisis, a decrease in remittances, cost increases for agricultural inputs and a decrease in employment opportunities for unqualified labour has led poorer people suffering from decreased capacities to access food and basic services.

The situation of Guatemala’s food shortages has received increased international attention. The World Food Programme (<“http://www.wfp.org/countries/guatemala”>WFP) recently held a video competition about the 1 billion people hungry in the world and the two aspiring filmmakers who won the grand prize are heading to Guatemala to highlight the plight of the drought-ridden country’s people.
________________

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

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JUST AN IDEA (Willem VAN COTTHEM)

Best practices to counter food shortages in dry regions, where child malnutrition is one of the main problems. Besides “national relief efforts and provide support for food, health, nutrition, agriculture and early recovery, as well as water, sanitation and hygiene projects for six months”(short-term relief), long-term solutions can be found in small-scale farming and gardening (BAN KI-MOON).  “Global acute malnutrition among children under the age of five” can be alleviated with small kitchen gardens in which container gardening contributes to saving water.

Even if “rising food prices brought on by the global economic crisis, a decrease in remittances, cost increases for agricultural inputs and a decrease in employment opportunities for unqualified labour has led poorer people suffering from decreased capacities to access food and basic services.”, low-budget investment in construction of family gardens and container gardening would lead to long-term and sustainable improvement in the living standards of the people in dry regions.

2008 – INDIA/TAMIL NADU/SCD PROJECT : Successful container gardening in a family garden, providing fresh food in  a drought-stricken area with a minimum of irrigation water.
2008 – INDIA/TAMIL NADU/SCDA PROJECT : Simple and inexpensive preparation of a family garden
2008 – INDIA/TAMIL NADU/SCDA PROJECT : Low-budget initiative with high return on investment
2008 – INDIA/TAMIL NADU/SCDA PROJECT : Child malnutrition alleviated with long-term fresh food production (vitamins, mineral elements).
2008 – INDIA/TAMIL NADU/SCDA PROJECT : With a small part of the financial support for food aid, transporting food to the affected areas, a sufficient number of kitchen gardens and school gardens can be installed.
2008 – INDIA/TAMIL NADU/SCDA PROJECT : SCAD’s women selfhelp groups feel extremely happy with the small agricultural inputs for their home garden. A challenge for all aid programmes.

GHANA: Volta Foundation to harness youth for faster development (NGO News Afrioca / Willem Van Cotthem)

Read at : NGO News Africa

GHANA: Volta Foundation to harness youth for faster development

Ho, Feb 18, GNA – The Volta Foundation, a development advocacy NGO, is to harness the energies of the youth to accelerate the economic growth of the Volta Region. Mr Dumega Raymond Okudzeto, President of the Foundation, was addressing its fourth anniversary durbar on Thursday in Ho under the theme “Harnessing Our Energies for the Accelerated development of the Volta Region: 2010, the Year for Youth Empowerment”. He described the youth as the region’s most treasured asset without whom the repositioning of the region for accelerated development cannot happen. Mr Okudzeto said the Foundation had assembled a team of resource persons to talk to the youth and inspire them to go the extra mile to achieve their life’s ambitions and become useful to the region and the country as a whole.

Volta Foundation has since its establishment campaigned alone and also partnered other organizations to find antidotes to the sluggish economic growth of the region. This culminated in the November 2009 Volta Trade and Investment Exposition in Ho held by the Foundation in collaboration with the Region’s political authority and the National Board for Small-Scale Industries (NBSSI) with technical support from the SNV. The Eastern Portfolio Coordinator of the Dutch Development Agency (SNV), Mr Dick Commandeur, said a good option for the youth in the region now was to get the skills and the cash to produce high quality agricultural produce.

He said it was not enough for officialdom to recognize that agriculture and tourism were the important economic sectors in the area, but also to “invest ideas, time and money to make the sectors give a good income so that they become attractive to young people”.

Mr Commandeur called for efforts to stimulate informal businesses, and urged young people to be “impregnated with the idea of entrepreneurship. They should also learn to “take initiative, take risk, elaborate new ideas and partner with others”.

Mrs Dorothy Gordon, Director of the Ghana/India Kofi Annan ICT Center, advised the youth to take advantage of the Volta Foundation’s ICT centers to be established in various parts of the region to gain skills that would enable them to boost their chances of getting employment.

Other papers delivered were on the state of agriculture in the region and its prospects.

Source: GNA http://www.ghananewsagency.org/s_economics/r_12679/

—————————————————————

MY COMMENT (Willem VAN COTTHEM)

Before gaining skills in the ICT centers “that would enable them to boost their chances of getting employment“, getting the skills and the cash to produce high quality agricultural produce would certainly be far more profitable for the African youth, not only that of Ghana.

Young people can deliver a tremendous contribution to the sustainable development of their region after being trained in the best practices of agriculture and horticulture.  On the African continent, in particular in rural regions where a high percentage of the population is regularly affected by hunger, NGOs should concentrate their efforts on small-scale farming and small-scale gardening.

Boys and girls can effectively help their families to secure sufficient food and to improve the families’ financial situation.  Take the example of Patrick HARRY in Malawi (see former postings on this blog), who has set up a “Youth Club”, called the “Future of Malawi”, in which he is training young people in container gardening.  His first successes were booked within a period of 2-3 months.

With very limited financial resources, rural and even urban youth can get the skills and the cash to produce high quality agricultural produce, be it with kitchen gardens, container gardening, allotment gardens or with vertical gardening in the cities. No one can deny all those success stories showing the remarkable return on investment of these cultivation methods, going back to the roots of the population in all the drylands of the world.  Once small-scale farming produces sufficient fresh food to bring food security, time will come to introduce new technologies.  Let us not put the horse behind the wagon !

Helping their families to quality fresh food and creating possibilities to take quality food to the market offers more opportunities to “harness youth for faster sustainable development”.

That is a noble challenge for all NGOs and Foundations, if not for the international agencies concerned.

No Green Wall without small-scale gardens for women (Willem Van Cotthem)

My attention was caught by some statements in Mrs. Priscilla ACHAKPA’s interview, referred to a former posting on my desertification blog:

Nigeria: WEP Wants Green Wall Sahara Programme (http://allafrica.com/stories/201002180504.html)

This Executive Director of the Women Environment Programme (WEP) urged the Nigerian Government to speed up the implementation of the Green Wall Sahara programme (GWSP), which she called “an integrated development strategy for combating desertification and mitigating the effects of drought and climate change” (see also UNCCD).

Mrs. ACHAKPA observed that the impact of desertification raised security concerns, especially among the vulnerable groups.  She stated that “the impact of climate change is more on women in the rural areas as they have little or no understanding of the issues involved”.  Her NGO, the WEP, intends to conduct a study on gender awareness of climate change issues, because adequate information on climate change is necessary to evolve steps to control it.

Agreeing with some of Mrs. ACHAKPA’s ideas, I want to congratulate her for asking to speed up the implementation of the Green Wall programme.  Indeed, such a nice programme, being a real challenge for all the Sahelian countries involved, merits massive support to speed up its achievement.

On the other hand, I disagree with her that Nigerian and other Sahelian rural women will be better off with “adequate information on climate change necessary to evolve steps to control it“.  Even supposing that there would be a small chance to find adequate information on climate change for rural women, I am not so sure that this will help these vulnerable women to handle their security concerns raised by the impact of desertification.

Even if the Green Wall programme may play a little bit of an interesting role in some aspects of climate change, it will not be tremendously important for the rural families in the northern provinces of Nigeria and in the other countries concerned.  I rather believe that it would be more efficient to invest in awareness building of the local population about the need to combine small-scale agriculture (or gardening) with reforestation in the Green Wall programme (agroforestry).

No doubt, we are all aware of the fact that such an enormous reforestation plan, with billions of trees to be planted in the Sahel belt, can never be achieved without “an army” of labourers for growing seedlings, digging plant pits and planting the seedlings.  These labourers will have to be well fed.  Tons of food will have to be produced at the local level.  By whom ?  By the local women ?  In this case, we would prefer that long time before the activities of the GWSP start all women can get “adequate information on ways and means to cultivate sufficient food for hundreds (thousands ?) of labourers of the GWSP working in their region”.

We can’t imagine that these women would be more interested in climate change issues than in best practices of food production in their dry region.

If well trained in cultivating all necessary species of vegetables and fruits, (dryland farming), they can not only use these skills during the implementation of the GWSP, but also for the rest of their life and that of their children, grandchildren, …

Therefore, just allow me this little piece of advice : start today laying out a small-scale garden for every woman in the northern provinces of Nigeria where the GWSP will be applied, because if there is not sufficient food production in those provinces when the labourers have to start planting trees, there will not be a Green Wall at all. Never, because planting trees with an empty stomach is so extremely difficult.  We all know this, even those strongly interested in climate change.

Collecting seeds of dragonfruit and tree tomato for development projects (Willem Van Cotthem)


Dragonfruits and tree tomatoes can be bought in supermarkets or fruit shops.

Dragonfruit is grown on the cactus Hylocereus :

  • Hylocereus undatus (Red Pitaya) has red-skinned fruit with white flesh, the most common “dragon fruit”.
  • Hylocereus costaricensis (Costa Rica Pitaya, often called H. polyrhizus) has red-skinned fruit with red flesh
  • Hylocereus megalanthus (Yellow Pitaya, formerly in Selenicereus) has yellow-skinned fruit with white flesh.

The fruit contains hundreds of black, shiny little seeds sitting in the pulp.  One can wash out the tender pulp in a fine sieve and dry the seeds on a plate (not on paper).  They usually germinate around two weeks after shallow planting.  Dry seeds can be sent to us (Beeweg 36 – BE9080 ZAFFELARE (Belgium).  We offer free seeds to different development projects in the drylands, thus enabling hungry people to grow fresh fruits in a sustainable way.

Dragonfruit (Hylocereus undatus) growing on climbing cacti - * Dragonfruit plantation - Photo Evariza Farms - 423871_101260033362712_1701936709_n.jpg
Dragonfruit (Hylocereus undatus) growing on climbing cacti – * Dragonfruit plantation – Photo Evariza Farms – 423871_101260033362712_1701936709_n.jpg
Dragonfruit - Photo WVC P1030067
Dragonfruit – Photo WVC P1030067
Cross section of dragonfruit with black seeds in white pulp - Photo WVC P1030059
Cross section of dragonfruit with black seeds in white pulp – Photo WVC P1030059
Dragonfruit's shiny black seeds in rests of whitish pulp - Photo WVC - P1030111
Dragonfruit’s shiny black seeds in rests of whitish pulp – Photo WVC – P1030111
Germination of dragonfruit seeds - Photo WVC - P1030133
Germination of dragonfruit seeds – Photo WVC – P1030133
Dragonfruit seedlings on household paper - Photo WVC - P1030129
Dragonfruit seedlings on household paper – Photo WVC – P1030129

The tree tomato grows on a Cyphomandra betacea tree.

Oval fruits only look like tomatoes.  The juicy orange pulp with purply red seeds can be washed out in a fine sieve by squeezing the pulp under running tap water.  The dark colour of the seeds (anthocyanins) disappears gradually until they are brownish.  Seeds can be dried on a plate (not on a paper).  Seedlings develop quite easily in humid potting soil.

Dry seeds sent to us (see address above) are offered for free to development projects in the drylands, where these tree tomatoes bring fresh food full of vitamins to the local people.  Thus, anyone can contribute to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in this world.

Tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea), an interesting fruit to be grown at the largest scale in the drylands. The tree should be incorporated in reforestation programs. - 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA BETACEA Photo WVC - P1030139.jpg
Tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea), an interesting fruit to be grown at the largest scale in the drylands. The tree should be incorporated in reforestation programs. – 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA BETACEA Photo WVC – P1030139.jpg
Cross-section of tree tomato with orange flesh (juicy pulp) and dark red seeds - 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA P1030143
Cross-section of tree tomato with orange flesh (juicy pulp) and dark red seeds – 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA Photo WVC – P1030143
Seeds of tree tomato sit on their small stalk - 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA P1030147
Seeds of tree tomato sit on their small stalk – 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA Photo WVC – P1030147
When purplish red anthocyanins are washed out the seeds turn brownish - 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA P1030151
When purplish red anthocyanins are washed out the seeds turn brownish – 2009-12-30 CYPHOMANDRA Photo WVC – P1030151
All contributions of dragonfruit seeds and tree tomato seeds are most welcome.  In the name of all the people affected by drought and desertification, suffering from malnutrition, hunger and poverty : Sincere thanks !

Help us with Navajo Globe Willow cuttings (Willem Van Cotthem)

Cuttings of Navajo Globe Willow (Salix matsudana ‘Navajo’)

As we are setting up tests with drought-resistant varieties of trees to be introduced in refugee camps in the desert, we are looking for small cuttings (20-25 cm, 8-10 inches) of the Navajo Globe Willow (Salix matsudana ‘Navajo’).  We would be very grateful receiving some cuttings to compare their drought tolerance.

2009-11-08 Cuttings of the Navajo Globe Willow in a plastic bottle and a glass to induce root formation

================
‘Navajo’ is a very hardy tree, adapted to high desert climates, round-headed upright and fast-growing, spreading, large, deciduous, long lived tree, medium-sized, 20’ to 70′ tall and wide.

The tree seems to be sheared into a perfect ball. Its branching habit results in a characteristic globe shape: a broad, rounded, perfectly symmetrical crown spread of mostly fifty feet. Young 15’ tall trees start showing the rounded crown.

Slender leaves are bright green, lance-shaped, 2″-4″ long, turning yellow in fall.

Unlike most willows, this variety is popular in high desert and drylands because it is drought-tolerant, adaptable to a wide range of soil conditions

The name of the ‘Navajo’ variety of the Globe Willow is probably synonym with ‘Umbraculifera’.

The Navajo Globe Willow is related to the Corkscrew willow (Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’).  Cuttings of this Corkscrew Willow would also be welcome.

===============

2009-11-23 Two weeks later a lot of roots are developing and the first branches are shooting

Please send some cuttings to:

Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM
BEEWEG 36
B 9080 ZAFFELARE (Belgium

WHY NOT USING CUTTINGS OF NAVAJO GLOBE WILLOW TO REFORESTATE DRYLANDS ? – Willem VAN COTTHEM

Cuttings of Navajo Globe Willow (Salix matsudana ‘Navajo’)

by Willem Van Cotthem – University of Ghent (Belgium)

We have been setting up successful tests with drought-resistant varieties of trees to be introduced in refugee camps. We are still looking for small cuttings (20-25 cm, 8-10 inches) of the Globe Navajo willow (Salix matsudana var. ‘Navajo’).

We would be very grateful to receive some cuttings from different origins to compare drought tolerance.

Who wants to help us to some cuttings ?  Please send them to :

Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem

Beeweg 36

B9080 ZAFFELARE

A cutting of Salix matsudana in a juice bottle can be easily transplanted in the field after cutting off the bottom of the bottle, setting the basal part of the rootball free (Photo WVC 2010-01)
A cutting of Salix matsudana in a juice bottle can be easily transplanted in the field after cutting off the bottom of the bottle, setting the basal part of the rootball free (Photo WVC 2010-01)

================
‘Navajo’ is a very hardy tree, adapted to high desert climates, round-headed upright and fast-growing, spreading, large, deciduous, long lived tree, medium-sized, 20’ to 70′ tall and wide.

The tree seems to be sheared into a perfect ball. Its branching habit results in a characteristic globe shape: a broad, rounded, perfectly symmetrical crown spread of mostly fifty feet. Young 15’ tall trees start showing the rounded crown.

Slender leaves are bright green, lance-shaped, 2″-4″ long, turning yellow in fall.

Unlike most willows, this variety is popular in high desert and drylands because it is drought tolerant, adaptable to a wide range of soil conditions

The name of the ‘Navajo’ variety of the Globe Willow is probably synonym with ‘Umbraculifera’.

The Navajo Globe Willow is related to the Corkscrew willow (Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’).  Cuttings of this Cortkscrew Willow would also be welcome.

===============

Please send some cuttings to:

Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM
BEEWEG 36
B 9080 ZAFFELARE (Belgium)