Argania and palm seedlings in a bottle (Willem)

Some weeks ago, I got some seedlings of Argania spinosa and a palm tree growing in my garden. I transplanted them in a plastic bottle to study the possibilities to grow them with a minimum of water.

The potting mix in the plastic bottle was treated with 5 g of the soil conditioner TerraCottem per liter of soil. The water stocking polymers of the TerraCottem reduce the irrigation needs by 50 %.

Seemingly the 3 seedlings are doing very well.

Argania seedlings and palm seedling in bottle
Two Argania seedlings and one palm seedling growing together in a plastic bottle. (Click on the photo to enlarge it).

Young maple trees growing in a plastic bottle (Willem)

I am really happy with the good results of my experiments with growing young trees in plastic bottles.

Here are a couple of images of young maple trees (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), grown for a couple of months in my garden. I want to take it to S.W. Algeria as a present for my friends the foresters of Tindouf, who are building up an arboretum.

Have a look at the nice development of this young tree :

p1010329-crop.jpg Young mapple in abottle

(Click on the photos to enlarge them)

Young maple tree growing with a minimum of water and fertilizer in a plastic bottle, ready to be transfered to the arboretum of Tindouf (S.W. Algeria).

Mahonia seedlings in selfwatering containers (Willem)

The mahogany shrub (Mahonia aquifolium) in my garden has been flowering and fruiting.  Its dark blue berries are normally eaten by the blackbirds, but this year I collected them in time, kept them drying for a couple of weeks and then planted the dry berries in a tray.  Other berries were opened and their little 2-3 kernel were taken out and washed.

Last week some of the berries in the tray germinated (the kernels did not yet).  I have planted some mahogany seedlings in a small coca-cola bottle, transformed into a self-watering container (see my photo below).  I expect that these seedlings will grow well, so that I can take the young trees to S.W. Algeria, where I want to introduce them as thorny shrubs to form a strong living hedge around the small family gardens in the refugee camps.

Mahonia seedlings in selfwatering container
(Click on the photo to enlarge it)

My self-watering containers with the mahogany seedlings :

(1) In front, a leaf of my mahogany shrub.

(2) Two yoghurt pots in which I can easily pour some water (serving as a mini water reservoir or tank).

(3) In each pot, an inverted coca-cola bottle of which I cut the bottom, filled with potting mix and TerraCottem soil conditioner, with a mahogany seedling planted on top.

(4) I left the lid (stop) on the bottles, but perforated the neck, close to the lid, at two opposite sites.

(5) The bottles are sucking up water from the yoghurt pots through the holes in the bottleneck.

(6) Water is stocked in the TerraCottem soil conditioner.

(7) Mahogany roots are growing towards the gel lumps of the swollen polymers.

(8) With a minimum of water and fertilizer the seedlings will be growing into nice young trees.

(9) The bottles will be cut vertically in two halves and buried in the plant hole at the moment of tree plantation (avoiding pollution of the environment with plastic).

Tree seedlings in a plastic bottle (Betula alba)

Since some months, I am experimenting growth of tree seedlings in transparent plastic (PET) bottles.  It’s a real success for a number of reasons:

(1) The potting mix, to which I have added a very small amount of water stocking soil conditioner TerraCottem (5 g per liter of soil), is kept continuously moistened (less evaporation, less heating effect than in the classical black plastic grow bags, used in nurseries)

(2) Individual watering of the bottles has a beneficial effect on plant growth.

(3) I can keep my seedlings in daily sight by having the bottles on the terrace.

(4) When the young trees are tall enough for plantation on site, I will dig a plant hole, cut the bottle vertically in two halves, tear the two halves apart and leave them on the bottom of the plant hole when filling the pit with local soil (to which I will add again some TerraCottem).

(5) This way I will take care of the environment by reusing the plastic bottles and finally burying them.

Here are a couple of photos of a young birch tree (Betula alba) growing in a plastic bottle :

Young birch tree in bottle   Birch tree and succulent in bottle

Young birch tree (Betula alba) and a succulent plant growing together in a plastic bottle. (Click on the photos to enlarge them).