Indoor Plants in Winter

Photo credit: The Record Herald

Rosemary in window-Turn 1/4 every few days to keep growth even (B.Petrucci)

Winter Care Tips for Indoors Plants

by Carol Kagan, Master Gardener

EXCERPT

From Master Gardeners I have learned a few key things, so here is my quick tip list followed by a number of great resource sites. It is important to check the needs of each plant since they can vary greatly.

Aloe roots crop - http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BhvAgFZ2Q4s/VMEdUMUBThI/AAAAAAAADU4/Yo2jVQRwhsw/s1600/aloe%2Broots%2Bcrop.jpg
Aloe roots crop – http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BhvAgFZ2Q4s/VMEdUMUBThI/AAAAAAAADU4/Yo2jVQRwhsw/s1600/aloe%2Broots%2Bcrop.jpg

1. Be sure the plant is potted in the right size container (with a drainage hole) and right potting soil.

If you are digging it up and dragging it in from the outdoors then potting it up, don’t use garden soil. It’s too heavy.

2- Water only as needed when the soil is dry.

Water from the top until water comes out the drainage hole (You do have a drainage hole, right?) into the saucer. About two hours later, drain any excess water from the saucer. Don’t allow the roots to stand in water. If you don’t see drainage but have watered well, check for a clog in the hole and clear it. Inconsistent watering is one of the primary reasons for plant loss.

3- Use room temperature water.

Leave tap water out overnight, uncapped or uncovered, to allow the chlorine and fluorine added to city water to dissipate. Although these probably don’t harm plants, you want the water to be at room temperature anyway. Rainwater, snow melt and well water are ok. Don’t use water run through water softeners.

4- Light should be appropriate for the plant. – See more at: http://www.therecordherald.com/article/20150122/BLOGS/301229993/1391#sthash.uFCa0nro.dpuf

Vegetables, herbs, vines and perennials are all finding their way into pots and boxes (Google / The Free Press)

Read at : Google Alert – container gardening

http://freepressonline.com/main.asp?SectionID=50&SubSectionID=72&ArticleID=13225

Home & Garden: Window Box Gardening

by Georgeanne Davis

Once upon a time, a window box was filled with red geraniums, blue lobelia and white petunias, with perhaps a vinca vine or ivy for trailers. Pretty, patriotic, traditional, but a bit boring year after year. Today there are a dizzying number of choices for window box and container gardening, the field no longer limited to flowering annuals. Vegetables, herbs, vines and perennials are all finding their way into pots and boxes. The rule of thumb is, if it has roots, it can go in a container. Continue reading Vegetables, herbs, vines and perennials are all finding their way into pots and boxes (Google / The Free Press)

Window Gardens

Read at : Windowfarms.org

http://www.windowfarms.org/

Hydroponic edible gardens for urban windows

What are Window Farms??

Window Farms are vertical, hydroponic, modular, low-energy, high-yield edible window gardens built using low-impact or recycled local materials.

Goal 1

to start a Windowfarming craze in New York City and other dense urban areas, helping people grow some of their food year-round in their apartment windows.

Goal 2

give ordinary folks a means to collaborate on research and development of these vertical hydroponic food-growing curtains through the community site at our.windowfarms.org

The Windowfarms Project operates in what seems a small niche, but we hope it might be what Buckminster Fuller would call a “trim tab,” a small part that turns giant ships by being particularly well placed. Growing some of our own food is a simple pleasure that can make a big difference in our relationship with nature. As we choose nutrients to feed plants we hope to eat in turn, we gain experience with a nearly-lost fundamental human art, get a microcosmic view of the food system, develop a stake in the conversation, and come up with new ideas for how to take care of ourselves and our planet in troubled times. Let’s make this experience possible for anyone!

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