Make fresh food available to those who lack resources for growing traditional gardens.

Photo credit: PRWeb

Garden Tower 2 on a residential balcony in Las Vegas.

Garden Tower Project Is a Natural Fit in Budding Las Vegas Green Community

Las Vegas schools, businesses and residents growing organic gardens in just 4 square feet with less water than conventional gardening with the Garden Tower 2.

VIDEOS

(1) https://youtu.be/dzYYYiZbixc?list=PLZJ7yBrlMJukQ2XG97JjakoqK1nxdbu2T

(2) https://youtu.be/UyQIGX-53PY

(3) https://youtu.be/4jvGDx5OCDc

Las Vegas is a city with a rapidly growing commitment to find green solutions for food sustainability and locally grown fruits and vegetables out of an almost certain, impending necessity. The Garden Tower Project, an Indiana-based company, has a direct answer for this desert community — the Garden Tower 2.

Community organizations, schools, restaurants and residents are using the Garden Tower Project’s Garden Tower 2, a container garden that makes growing organic vegetables a reality in locations that have never before been capable of nourishing plants, like flat rooftops, concrete slabs and ordinary decks.

Early adopters of the Garden Tower 2 report water savings of as much as 90 percent compared to traditional garden plots because of low evaporation from the vertical design. This helps wherever one lives, but is particularly critical in high-altitude, drought-stricken areas and desert environments. The Garden Tower 2 re-uses the water draining through the tower—this increases productivity and preserves nutrient density and is vital to growing in challenging areas like Las Vegas.

“Our mission at Garden Tower Project is to make fresh food available to those who lack resources for growing traditional gardens. We applaud the Las Vegas community for all of its efforts in what we see as a national model for local food production and community resilience,” said Garden Tower Project’s Tom Tlusty. “We are honored that our Garden Tower 2 can be part of the solution and are dedicated to helping more people learn how easy it can be to grow their own food.”

Garden Tower 2s can be spotted in the community gardens that are springing up across Las Vegas, in the many schools that are dedicating classes to food education, and in restaurants that want to serve the freshest food to their customers.

Read the full article: PRWeb

=============

Comment of Willem Van Cotthem (Zaffelare Belgium)

If you are not interested in this commercial version of a tower garden, you may be trying to build bucket towers like we did in our backyard garden.  It’s simple and cheap, but very efficient too.

A pyramid of 3 bucket towers planted with flowering plants, vegetables and herbs - Photo WVC 2015-05-24 P1120178
A pyramid of 3 bucket towers planted with flowering plants, vegetables and herbs – Photo WVC 2015-05-24 P1120178

The Vertical Veg Club

 

Vertical Veg Club – “Pay what you can afford”

The Vertical Veg Club is an online community for container growers. We’re united by our enthusiasm for growing food in small urban spaces. We share experiences and learn from each other and professional growers. We also swap seeds. If you want to join but are not in a position to pay the monthly membership fee, I can (thanks to a kind donation) now offer a few ‘pay what you can afford’ places. To apply, please email me, saying why you want to join the club and what you hope to get out of it. You can read a bit more about the club here

Gardeners Question Time

My five minutes of fame. You can hear a short interview with me about Vertical Veg on BBC Gardeners Question on the BBC Iplayer here, it starts about 12 minutes in. 

Neighbors and containers on a balcony

Photo credit: Mark Ridsdill Smith

See also Mark’s Facebook page

Rental inspiration: in an email message of Mark Ridsdill Smith

 

Sara Li (in London) and Sara Paasch Knudsen (in Copenhagen) recently shared their learning of growing on their rented balconies for the Vertical Veg Facebook Page – see posts 15 – 31 May. Highlights included Sara Li’s video about her windy balcony (love this!) and Sara PK’s story about growing with her neighbours (if you’re not on Facebook, you can also read her story at the bottom of this email.)

Neighbors – the joy of living in rented accommodations

By Sara Paasch Knudsen

“I live in a third floor apartment in central Copenhagen and Danish people in the city are not good at connecting with our neighbors. This changed for me last season because of my garden.

At the start of last season I found myself with an excess of plants; tomatoes, peppers and zucchinis. When you have a limited space; what do you do with them? I posted to my friends on Facebook and I got one garden convert out of it. A friend, who had not tried gardening on his balcony before, got a couple of tomatoes. He is now hooked and has been back for more plants this season. But I still had more plants left and I didn’t want to destroy them. So what to do?

I wrote a note one weekend offering free plants and hung it on the door to our third floor walkway. I thought maybe one person would come by and get a plant or two. Imagine my surprise when 3 of my 4 neighbors came by. After a talk they all walked out with plants and I now knew my neighbors a lot better than I did before. I even ended up plant sitting for those 3 neighbors during the holidays.

…. (continued)

The Container Gardening Ambassadors (the Fresh Food Home Guards)

All we need is your free moral support to make this world better

by Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem (University of Ghent, Belgium)

Become a member of our container gardening group by clicking the ‘JOIN’ button at https://www.facebook.com/groups/221343224576801/  

(today almost 43.000 members).

Here are some of your trumps

Bottle towers with vegetables and herbs - Photo WVC P 1070455 - Video https://youtu.be/HuykRRspWOY.
Bottle towers with vegetables and herbs – Photo WVC P 1070455 – Video https://youtu.be/HuykRRspWOY.

1. If we show how to build a bottle tower <http://youtu.be/-uDbjZ9roEQ> to all the schoolchildren of this world and teach them how to grow some vegetables and herbs at school, they will enjoy building more towers for their family at home.

Riser with vegetables and herbs growing in recycled bottles - Photo Jojo ROM (The Philippines)  56269_1483085875405_1181604134_31159685_1301366_o.jpg
Riser with vegetables and herbs growing in recycled bottles – Photo Jojo ROM (The Philippines) 56269_1483085875405_1181604134_31159685_1301366_o.jpg

2. If we alleviate child malnutrition in our countries by teaching them container gardening at school, recycling all discarded containers in school gardens, e.g. on risers (see

video https://youtu.be/l7o_5UKIKTo

and <http://www.facebook.com/willemvancotthem>),

there will be sufficient food for decent daily meals and a cleaner environment.

And soon there will be fresh food galore everywhere.

Dwarf orange fruit trees grown in pots - Photo Container Growing - .jpg
Dwarf orange fruit trees grown in pots – Photo Container Growing – .jpg

3. If we convince all young mothers to plant only one fruit tree for every newborn baby and if we plant a fruit tree for every dear family member passing away, we will soon have orchards protecting us against global warming and climate change.

Barrels  cab easily be transformed in vertical gardens with a lot of fresh food - Photo Grow Food, Not Lawns - 542232_449799711742313_474788682_n.jpg
Barrels can easily be transformed in vertical gardens with a lot of fresh food – Photo Grow Food, Not Lawns – 542232_449799711742313_474788682_n.jpg

4. If we pass this message to the world leaders and publish all our photos to show them our green container gardens, it will be a giant convincing step towards a global food revolution.

And soon there will be less hunger because container gardening means solving these major problems at the lowest cost.  People in developing countries have been inventive to grow fresh food in a panoply of containers (pots, buckets, bags, sacks, barrels, …).  There is a lot of indigenous knowledge about best practices and success stories in food production. It is our moral duty to follow their examples and invest in large-scale application of their methods and techniques.  International organizations should reach hands with NGOs to ban hunger and malnutrition without any delay.  They should start in all the schools.

Let us put an important step towards a better future today:

JOIN THE GROUP OF CONTAINER GARDENING AMBASSADORS.  They are the Fresh Food Home Guards !

IT IS TOTALLY FREE : https://www.facebook.com/groups/221343224576801/ 

Go vertical

Photo credit: Vertical garden – Photo Jamie’s Garden Shop – 954693_615794005099659_1861047914_n copy.jpg

Gardening: Get out of your horizontal trench, plant a vertical garden

By LYNN JACKSON KIRK

In this earlier exhibit, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s vertical display of orchids relied on plant-friendly felt pockets sewn by Director of Horticulture Grace Chapman and volunteers - http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/richmond.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0af38d-42d4-58d1-8bf6-4e956e259abe/554d1524a8ba4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450
In this earlier exhibit, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s vertical display of orchids relied on plant-friendly felt pockets sewn by Director of Horticulture Grace Chapman and volunteers – http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/richmond.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0af38d-42d4-58d1-8bf6-4e956e259abe/554d1524a8ba4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450

 

Plant walls, 3-D gardens, micro gardens. Whatever you call them, vertical gardens are all these and more. Unlike traditional in-ground garden beds that typically follow horizontal planes, vertical gardens grow to new heights — and new lows — by reaching up, cascading down or layering plants.

Scotty Guinn Dilworth, a Richmond horticulturist and owner of SG Designs, became intrigued with vertical gardens 12 years ago while living in California. Now, Dilworth considers this art form her niche for making an impact in central Virginia gardens.

“A vertical garden is living art that enhances small spaces,” making them ideal for intimate and enclosed areas, Dilworth said. “Richmond has a lot of interesting neighborhoods like the Fan and Carytown that don’t have a lot of green space, so vertical gardening is one way to have plants without multiple containers that take up a footprint.”

Read the full article: Richmond Times-Dispatch

Basics of vertical gardening

Photo credit: Susan Lancto

Vertical Gardening: A basic Know How

Vertical Gardening is now a days getting very popular among the gardeners. Particularly with urban people where the space for gardening is very limited. But to many of us it is still only a combination of two words with so much mystery surrounded around it. Through this blog I made an attempt to demystify the concept of Vertical Gardening and make people motivated enough to start doing it.

Vertical gardening is an innovative, effortless, and highly productive gardening technique, that utilizes various resources to allow plant to grow vertically rather than along the surface of the horizon. If you have some empty wall or bare fence you can beautify those by applying Vertical Gardening techniques. Edibles, annuals, per-annuals what ever is your choice you can apply vertical gardening to almost every possible container plant. Most of the plants can grow without any support, in some cases like Ivy or some particular vegetables you need to provide some sort of support in the form of stakes, cages etc in order to grow properly.

– See more at: http://gardeningabc.blogspot.be/2013/06/vertical-gardening-basic-know-how.html#sthash.vYCSrHLd.dpuf

Jardin vertical à base de bouteilles (French)/ Vertical garden with bottle towers (L’Avenir / Martine DAUBREME)

Lu au :

http://www.lavenir.net/article/detail.aspx?articleid=DMF20130326_00287572

Un jardin vertical à base de bouteilles

par

  • l’avenir
  • Michel DEMEESTER

LOUVAIN-LA-NEUVE – Martine Daubremé a créé un concept original de jardin vertical à base de bouteilles, qu’elle a présenté à la Maison du développement durable.

Dans le cadre de la Semaine sans pesticides, la Maison du développement durable de Louvain-la-Neuve organisait une série d’activités samedi dernier. Parmi celles-ci la découverte du jardin vertical à base de bouteilles, présenté par Martine Daubremé, comptable en entreprise depuis vingt-cinq ans mais aussi présidente d’Actions Vivres : «Nous développons des solutions alternatives face aux crises du climat. Nous travaillons également sur la sécurité alimentaire dans le monde», explique Martine Daubremé.

Depuis sa rencontre il y a cinq ans, avec Willem Van Cotthem, professeur en sciences botaniques de l’Université de Gand, Martine Daubremé travaille avec celui-ci : «Il est spécialisé en désertification. Il a travaillé dans le désert. Il a mis en place des solutions pour la culture dans des régions arides. Ces systèmes, nous les importons aujourd’hui chez nous pour permettre aux personnes de cultiver.»

Le jardin vertical, à base de bouteilles, permet de cultiver sur un balcon ou un appui de fenêtre, par exemple : «Les bouteilles sont empilées à l’envers les unes dans les autres. Elles sont remplies de terreau. Les bouchons sont enlevés, sauf sur la bouteille du haut et sur celle du bas. Deux trous sont réalisés dans le bouchon de la bouteille du haut. Cela permet un arrosage goutte à goutte de la terre située dans les bouteilles en dessous. Le bouchon de la bouteille du bas est maintenu mais les côtés évasés de la bouteille sont troués pour éviter que l’eau stagne dans le bas de la colonne. Un bac récolte l’éventuel excès d’eau sous la colonne. L’eau est ainsi récupérée», explique Martine Daubremé.

Les graines sont déposées dans la terre par les encoches réalisées sur les bords des bouteilles. C’est par ce biais que vont pousser les légumes : «Je récupère les graines des aliments. On peut tout faire pousser dans les bouteilles en plastique : des plantes aromatiques, de la salade, du céleri, des poireaux, des oignons, ou même des carottes.» Les feuilles impropres à la consommation sont replacées dans la terre pour en faire du compost.

La bouteille offre aussi l’avantage de maintenir la chaleur : «On placera préférentiellement la colonne à l’abri des caprices du climat, bien souvent au soleil.»

Garden trends (Google / Raindrops Cisterns)

Read at : Google Alert – container gardening

http://rdcisterns.com/2012/01/06/garden-trends-2012/

Top garden trends for 2012

Plants that do more and cost less. Water saving strategies. Black and amber foliage. Small-space landscaping. Metal décor. Growing up (vertical gardening). And a bigger focus on front yards over back yards.

These are just a few of the hot gardening trends for 2012 that have been identified by various experts around North America and beyond.

But arguably the most significant trend is the emergence of what are being called “urban knights” – a growing army of new do-gooder green thumbs who are creating food and flower gardens wherever space will allow – on abandoned building sites, rooftops, balconies, alley ways, and in the limited space of their own front yards.

According to Susan McCoy, of the U.S.-based trend-spotting Garden Media Group, this new generation of gardeners is composed of environmentally-conscious Gen Xs and Ys who believe in the power of plants and regard plants as “no longer a luxury, but a necessity for our lives.”

This new horticultural ground force knows that “plants can live without us, but we can’t live without plants.

(continued)

Growing vegetables in bottle towers (Willem VAN COTTHEM / Perrine COLLIN / Eric SECRETARIO)

Read at :

http://desertification.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/growing-vegetables-in-bottle-towers-to-combat-hunger-and-malnutrition-willem-van-cotthem-perrine-collin-eric-secretario/

Growing vegetables in bottle towers to combat hunger and malnutrition (Willem VAN COTTHEM / Perrine COLLIN / Eric SECRETARIO)

2011-11 - Perrine COLLIN (CABIOKID Foundation) at the Manila seminar) - (Photo Eric SECRETARIO)

Make a VERTICAL CONTAINER FARM for the hungry and malnourished (Willem Van Cotthem)

My special attention was drawn to an article in ‘The Victoria Times Colonist’, a Victoria and Vancouver Island newspaper.  The article’s title was “Start a veggie grow-op”.

Let me highlight a few paragraphs :

  1. Knowing she couldn’t control the weather and wanting fresh vegetables year round were reasons enough for longtime Calgarian Ursula de Vries to come up with a way to grow food indoors. And thus, Vertical Veggie Farms was born.
  2. The mother of five wanted to give her family fresh food 12 months out of the year while trimming the grocery bill. “One of the major expenses we have in our household is food, so I thought if I could change the way I do things with food, that it would lessen the impact,” she says.
  3. The Vertical Veggie Farm (available for $340) is a hydroponic growing system that comprises a movable stand that measures 158 centimetres high, 51 cm deep and 114 cm wide with 15 plant spaces suspended by wire and five solution reservoirs. It also comes with the proper light bulbs, 15 hydroponic starter cubes, growing fill, organic solution, as well as heritage seeds of beans, lettuce, chard and kale.
  4. “I thought to go vertical for the space and it’s small enough to put near windows to use free light,” de Vries says, adding she also uses recycled material, such as two-litre sparkling water bottles, for the vegetable containers.
  5. “Plus, it’s pretty mobile . there’s no bolting things to the wall” so the system is easy to dismantle.
  6. I think it’s something people can really get into, home food production, whether it’s in an apartment or if they’ve got a garden or anything like that.”

It goes without saying that I could not resist translating some of these paragraphs to the situations in which a billion people and children are living in chronic hunger and malnutrition :

  1. Knowing they can’t control the drought and needing fresh vegetables year round are reasons enough for experts, wanting to find a solution for the hunger problem, to come up with a way to grow food under drought conditions. And thus, Vertical Container Farming has to be developed.
  2. The mothers want to give their family fresh food 12 months out of the year while trimming the grocery bill. One of the major expenses they have in their household is food, so if we could change the way to let them produce cheaper food themselves, that would lessen the impact.
  3. A VERTICAL CONTAINER FARM (made available at the lowest prize) is a simple system using towers of cheap containers (bottles, pots, trays, buckets, etc.) to grow fresh food with a minimum of water in the smallest space. It can be constructed by any family, using otherwise littered, recycled containers, to be filled with some local soil enriched with manure (growing fill).  At the start of the program, each family should be offered some good seeds of vegetables and herbs.
  4. Each family can go vertical for the space and keep the VERTICAL CONTAINER FARM small enough to put it close to the house or in the shadow of a wall.
  5. The system must be easy to dismantle.
  6. People all over the world can really get into home food production, whether it’s in an apartment or if they’ve got a garden or anything like that.
——-
Maybe you think I am only dreaming ?
Well, may I invite you to have a good look at some photos about my own VERTICAL CONTAINER GARDEN made of plastic bottles of sparkling water (Spa, Bru, Koningswater), Coca-Cola, Lipton ice-tea and white mayonnaise pots?
Do you still think it’s impossible to offer to every hungry family in the world, in cities and villages, in suburbs and refugee camps, a VERTICAL CONTAINER GARDEN or FARM ?
Suppose the Western world would send all it’s aid goods in barrels, drums, buckets, pots etc to the developing countries.  Suppose the children at school would have their own VERTICAL CONTAINER GARDEN with all the bottles, cans and pots otherwise littered.  Suppose all the hungry families would get that little bit of help to start up such a personal family garden.
I strongly believe this would really change the world.  It would certainly alleviate hunger and malnutrition.
Anyone to have a better, cheaper, and more practical idea ?
I listen.
=====================================