Planting in a barrel

Photo credit: PlantaSonya

Cabbages in a barrel

Container Gardening: Utilizing a Whiskey Barrel

The whiskey barrel as a planter has been a attempted and genuine process of acquiring a prominent screen for your back garden. The size of these wooden planters makes them ideal for big shrubs or tiny trees, or even as an herb back garden, suitable for outside the kitchen door. More, these barrels final for many years, even many years, in advance of needing to be changed.

Utilizing whiskey barrels for gardening will recapture the rustic nostalgia of the earlier and build a charming planter for your perennials, shrubs, trees, or herbs, which will be the talk of your neighborhood. You will need to come to a decision irrespective of whether to use a full-size whiskey barrel or a 50 percent-size barrel. If you come to a decision on a 50 percent barrel, you will then need to come to a decision irrespective of whether you will use it standing upright, or put it on its side and have your bouquets flowing out of it. Furthermore, think about where you will put your barrel and make certain this is the appropriate location, as once full, the barrel will be far too heavy to shift all over the back garden. Also, consider the size plants you will be utilizing in the barrel. These containers have a whole lot of soil ability for a much bigger plant.

Read the full article: Popular 1000

The big top ten organic gardening tips (Google / Beautiful Home and Garden)

Read at : Google Alert – gardening

http://beautifulhomegarden.blogspot.com/2008/09/big-top-ten-organic-gardening-tips.html

The big top ten organic gardening tips

By using only organic gardening supplies, your gardening tasks will be easier and more enjoyable.• Compost, an all natural soil amendment is made through the use of composters. Composters break down organic materials such as leaves, grass clippings, and food scraps to make a 100% organic, all natural soil additive. Composters come in varying shapes, sizes and designs. Research composters and choose one that meets your needs. Making your own natural compost is a great alternative to other organic gardening supplies you would ordinarily have to buy, and it’s free!

• Rain Barrels collect water from your roof and store it until needed. Rain water is softer and chemical free. Rain Barrels are great for keeping your plants healthy and saving water. Many rain barrels are made from reused food drums and recycled plastic, keeping with the commitment to sustainable living. You can collect approximately 675 gallons of rain off your roof from a single rain storm. Stored rain water supplies much needed moisture to your gardens during extreme dry spells where rationing is necessary.

• All Natural and organic fertilizers supplies much needed nutrients to plantings. Natural and organic fertilizers generally have a slow release so nutrients last over time. Natural and organic fertilizers such as liquefied worm poop and tea from composters, are among the top natural and organic fertilizers and an essential ingredient to your organic gardening supplies.

• Push reel mowers are a great way to be eco friendly! Push reel mowers use no gas or electric, only your own energy. Push reel mowers are lightweight, easy to use and gives your lawn that golf course look. Owning a push reel mower is an important part of organic gardening.

• Grow native plants. Native plants require less water. They are also naturally more insect and disease resistant than other plants. Healthy, lush gardens made from indigenous plants also make a natural home for birds.

Container gardening is good for planting your favorite flowers and vegetables when space is limited! Use large containers such as steel buckets and wooden barrels for creative container gardening. Container gardens do not require a lot of organic material due to being enclosed. Many gardening containers such as green pots are all natural, made from all natural elements such as rice hulls and coconut fiber.

• Using only natural and organic gardening supplies such as Insecticidal Soap, Horticultural Oil or Organic Disease Control will keep your garden healthy, naturally. Organic gardening supplies leave no hazardous residue and break down naturally into the soil. Natural predators such as bats, praying mantis and ladybugs are great organic insect controls. Bat boxes are effective for keeping bats nearby and supplies shelter through the harsh winter months. Enjoying and benefiting from organic gardening is dependent upon the use of the highest quality organic gardening supplies.

• Mulch your flowerbeds and vegetable garden to retain moisture around plants. Mulch supplies your plants with much needed moisture throughout hot, sunny days. Mulching also keeps weeds away. Apply all natural worm poop fertilizer around plantings when mulching. Your organic garden will love you for it. • Create a bird habitat by placing bird houses, birdbaths and bird feeders in your yard. Birds are fun to watch and will control the insect population in a natural way. Pick a quiet section of your yard to keep a variety of birding supplies to attract birds of your choice. Bird food such as sunflower hearts and suet are great treats. • Whether you are working on your lawn, flowerbed or vegetable garden, have fun. Remember, all natural supplies will make organic gardening easier and more enjoyable. The following is a list of recommended all natural and organic gardening supplies: composter, rain barrels, organic fertilizers, push reel mower, natural gardening containers, birding supplies, natural homemade compost, These are the best equipment, tools and supplies for keeping your plants, turf and environment healthy.

Happy Gardening!

This article may be reproduced and/or distributed. This article was written by Mark & Vera Pappas, Co-owners of http://www.greennationgardens.com/?Click=23GreenNationGardens.com, suppliers of unique and eco-friendly garden supplies.

Container gardening for all (selfsufficientish)

Read at :

selfsufficientish

http://www.selfsufficientish.com/container.htm

Container gardening

So you live in a flat or a house with a small back yard and just don’t have room for gardening? Many people will take one look at this site and think, “I live in a small flat in Bristol (or wherever) I can’t be self sufficient”. This is true but you can be selfsufficientish. With a bit of lateral thinking you will surprised how much room you actually have. I was very impressed when I took a trip around Primrose Hill in London the other week. I saw an abundance of plants all growing in limited space. I also saw potential for many more. Whether it is just a window box, hanging basket or just a few pots on the patio you will soon find that you too could be self sufficientish. Continue reading Container gardening for all (selfsufficientish)

A special container form : the grow tower (Willem)

Years ago, I visited a colleague in Beijing (Prof. Dr. WANG Tao), who showed me a peculiar way of growing garlic plants on vertical “poles”. In fact, the poles were PVC pipes, about 10-12 cm (4-5 inches) in diameter, in which a series of 4-5 cm (1 ½ to 2 inches) holes were drilled. The holes were spaced randomly around the pipe, about 4-5 cm (1 ½ to 2 inches) apart.

An impressive series of pipes were standing as “grow towers” in a greenhouse, so that in a relatively small space a maximum of plants were kept growing from floor to ceiling. Each pipe was filled with potting soil and the pipes were watered with a sort of drip irrigation system. In every hole of each grow tower a garlic bulb was growing splendidly (flowering towers !).

This brought me to the idea that a smaller number of plants could also be grown on PET bottles. It suffices to cut a number of holes in the wall of the bottle, filled with potting soil, to create a small grow tower (see my first experimental designs) :

Vertical grow tower

Bottle with 3 holes at one side. The same number can be cut at the opposite side. (Click on the picture to enlarge it).

Bottle grow tower

Mini grow tower : holes cut in the bottle wall fashioned with scotch tape.

 

I intend to set up some experiments with similar grow towers next week and I will post the results as soon as possible.

 

Today, I was reading an interesting description of other types of grow tower, made in wood. Here is the text that I found in The Tucson Gardener (2004) :

http://www.tucsongardener.com/Year04/strawberryadventures.htm

The Homemade Strawberry Tower
Y
ou would think by now that I’d be out of new strawberry plants but I wasn’t. I still had about 50 young, healthy plants that needed to find a place in the garden or were destined for the compost bin. I happened to read where someone suggested drilling holes in a whiskey barrel filling the barrel with potting soil and the holes with strawberry plants. That’s when I decided I’d build a grow tower from inexpensive wood just to see what would happen.

Using cedar fence boards and lots of screws I made a four foot tall by about 15 – inch square container. Then I drilled a bunch of evenly spaced inch and a half diameter holes.

I then treated the outside of the wood with a water sealer and moved the whole thing to a place in the vegetable garden where I placed it on four concrete stepping stones to keep it from sitting on the ground. I ran a loop of soaker hose down to the bottom of the four foot tower and hooked it up to the watering system.

Then came the hard part – planting the strawberry plants. I filled the container with a good potting mix and some slow release fertilizer putting plants in the holes as I filled the tower. At the top I added a few more plants. Eventually I had to replace three plants that didn’t make it because I may have planted them too deeply covering the crown.

I had plans to make a removable cage that I could slip over the tower with the beginning of fruit production to fend of birds and rodents but production wasn’t so great that I needed to build the cage. I did construct a simple frame to support shade cloth to help the plants make it through the hot summer.

I must admit I like the looks of my tower but it hasn’t been a big strawberry producer. My biggest fear is it may fall apart sooner than I’d like. I’m hoping it will last for three years. The verdict isn’t yet in. Until then the strawberry tower makes and interesting addition to the vegetable garden.(2004)”

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Looking at all these possibilities to construct “grow towers” from pipes, bottles, barrels, wood etc., I am wondering if some of you would come up with more interesting ideas. I am looking forward to your descriptions and preferably with photos.

What a wonderful world, this container gardening, in particular for people living in the drylands, who can grow vegetables and fruits without needing to install gardens in desertlike soils, saving a lot of water and getting fresh food with minimal efforts !

 

Several methods for strawberry production (Tucson Gardener)

Read at :

The Tucson Gardener

http://www.tucsongardener.com/Year04/strawberryadventures.htm

The Strawberry Adventures

It’s easy to start new strawberry plants from the runners. Each small pot is the beginning of a new plant.

Last year’s impulse purchase of a dozen bare-root strawberry plants and two plastic grow bags turned into an adventure in search of a suitable method to grow strawberries in my garden. The plastic grow bags are long gone but the strawberry plants have multiplied and prospered. Whether it’s worth the few strawberries I picked this past spring is debatable but you can’t say I didn’t try several methods for strawberry production with varying degrees of success. Strawberry plants produce runners which in turn produce a plant at the end and then the new plant may send off another runner and so forth. The plants easily root whether it’s in the soil or small soil filled pots. The simplicity of strawberry plant propagation is what caused my troubles to begin. I rooted just about every plantlet I saw and by the end of last summer (2003) I had dozens and dozens of young strawberry plants. Continue reading Several methods for strawberry production (Tucson Gardener)