The Container Gardening Ambassadors (the Fresh Food Home Guards)

All we need is your free moral support to make this world better

by Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem (University of Ghent, Belgium)

Become a member of our container gardening group by clicking the ‘JOIN’ button at https://www.facebook.com/groups/221343224576801/  

(today almost 43.000 members).

Here are some of your trumps

Bottle towers with vegetables and herbs - Photo WVC P 1070455 - Video https://youtu.be/HuykRRspWOY.
Bottle towers with vegetables and herbs – Photo WVC P 1070455 – Video https://youtu.be/HuykRRspWOY.

1. If we show how to build a bottle tower <http://youtu.be/-uDbjZ9roEQ> to all the schoolchildren of this world and teach them how to grow some vegetables and herbs at school, they will enjoy building more towers for their family at home.

Riser with vegetables and herbs growing in recycled bottles - Photo Jojo ROM (The Philippines)  56269_1483085875405_1181604134_31159685_1301366_o.jpg
Riser with vegetables and herbs growing in recycled bottles – Photo Jojo ROM (The Philippines) 56269_1483085875405_1181604134_31159685_1301366_o.jpg

2. If we alleviate child malnutrition in our countries by teaching them container gardening at school, recycling all discarded containers in school gardens, e.g. on risers (see

video https://youtu.be/l7o_5UKIKTo

and <http://www.facebook.com/willemvancotthem>),

there will be sufficient food for decent daily meals and a cleaner environment.

And soon there will be fresh food galore everywhere.

Dwarf orange fruit trees grown in pots - Photo Container Growing - .jpg
Dwarf orange fruit trees grown in pots – Photo Container Growing – .jpg

3. If we convince all young mothers to plant only one fruit tree for every newborn baby and if we plant a fruit tree for every dear family member passing away, we will soon have orchards protecting us against global warming and climate change.

Barrels  cab easily be transformed in vertical gardens with a lot of fresh food - Photo Grow Food, Not Lawns - 542232_449799711742313_474788682_n.jpg
Barrels can easily be transformed in vertical gardens with a lot of fresh food – Photo Grow Food, Not Lawns – 542232_449799711742313_474788682_n.jpg

4. If we pass this message to the world leaders and publish all our photos to show them our green container gardens, it will be a giant convincing step towards a global food revolution.

And soon there will be less hunger because container gardening means solving these major problems at the lowest cost.  People in developing countries have been inventive to grow fresh food in a panoply of containers (pots, buckets, bags, sacks, barrels, …).  There is a lot of indigenous knowledge about best practices and success stories in food production. It is our moral duty to follow their examples and invest in large-scale application of their methods and techniques.  International organizations should reach hands with NGOs to ban hunger and malnutrition without any delay.  They should start in all the schools.

Let us put an important step towards a better future today:

JOIN THE GROUP OF CONTAINER GARDENING AMBASSADORS.  They are the Fresh Food Home Guards !

IT IS TOTALLY FREE : https://www.facebook.com/groups/221343224576801/ 

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Containers full of strawberries

Photo credit: Better Home Gardening

10 Useful Tips for Growing Strawberries in Containers

Strawberries are one of the most sought after fruits in the world. Their sweet and sour tinge makes them perfect for desserts, jams, or even when eaten as it is. Not only that but strawberry smoothies, shakes also are also very healthy and a joy to drink. Most of us buy strawberries from the market. But the ones of have a knack of having home grown fruit or vegetables, the idea of growing strawberries in their backyard is quite appealing.

Growing strawberries in a pot at your home also means you get taste the fresh strawberries as they are. You use all organic material with nothing artificial in the growth of these beauties and have them as much as you want. Strawberries are also grown in containers which must be quite a relief for those of you who don’t have a garden. Growing strawberries in a pot is actually a simple task and you can easily do it by getting to know the environment where they grow and the nature of the strawberries.

Read the full article: Better Home Gardening

How to harvest your own pineapple ?

Photo credit: LJWorld

Taking the time to grow your own pineapple plant is worth the bragging rights

Garden Variety: Grow your own pineapple

By Jennifer Smith

EXCERPT

The easiest way to grow a pineapple plant is to start with a pineapple fruit. Shop for one with healthy green foliage at the top, as this is the start for the new plant. When you get the pineapple home, remove the top by cutting the pineapple about a half-inch below the base of the leaves. Then, carefully trim away the edges of the fruit in that half-inch portion to leave only the hard core tissue in the center. Remove a few of the leaves right around the base also.

And so, the day arrives when their more than six year journey ends - http://insidenanabreadshead.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/pineapple-update-august-2011.jpg
And so, the day arrives when their more than six year journey ends – http://insidenanabreadshead.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/pineapple-update-august-2011.jpg

The short piece of core at the bottom of the pineapple top needs to dry before planting, so leave it on the counter for a few days. Then, when the top is ready for planting, fill a small container with perlite, vermiculite or coarse sand (available at most garden centers). Make sure the container has drainage holes in the bottom, and moisten the planting media thoroughly before planting. Insert the pineapple top into the planting media up to the base of the remaining leaves. Set the container near a window or door that receives bright but indirect light.

Read the full article: LJWorld

Containers in the farm-to-table movement

Photo credit: Google

Ethnic restaurant Asian garden

Farm-To-Table Will Change Us [Opinion]

by Carol Miller

Unlike all the trends our industry has seen come and go, the farm-to-table movement has the power to rewrite our future.

A trend is like a wind that disturbs a pond but doesn’t reshape it. Take gazing globes, huge 10 years ago. They made our industry a lot of money, but their popularity faded, and we moved on, unchanged.

Container gardens had a bigger impact. They were a hit with customers who wanted instant gratification and with retailers who liked selling several products at once. They also reflected a changing customer base, who valued getting the visual impact of gardening without the work.

Home grown vegetables - http://perfectgardeningtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/container-vegetables.jpg
Home grown vegetables – http://perfectgardeningtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/container-vegetables.jpg

I want to take the time to unpack that thought. Container gardens’ popularity rose along with the flood of smart phones, big, immersive TVs and games like Candy Crush. People still eat out, go to theaters and, yes, garden. But they spend less time doing so.

So it can be argued that selling container gardens was a necessary adaption to our customers’ lifestyles.

Combo gardens had a bigger impact than gazing globes. But what gazing globes are to container gardens, that’s what combo gardens are to the farm-to-table movement.

Read the full article: Today’s Garden Center

Grow fruits in container

Photo credit: Little Bit of Green

Fig tree

The Top 3 Container Garden Fruits

by Ronald A. Rowe

EXCERPT

When it comes to container fruit gardens there are three tried and true best bets for the beginning gardener.  The most common is the strawberry.  Strawberries grow quite well in containers.  The smallish roots adapt well to being constrained and you even avoid some of the hazards of growing them in-ground.  Not all strawberry plants are alike.  Some will bear fruit only once a year, others provide multiple crops.  Some have large berries while others are tiny.  One type is not necessarily better than the others.  Choose the type that best suits your preferences but do be sure that you know what kind you are getting.

As is the case with most types of plants, the twin keys to healthy strawberry plants are watering and sunlight.  Full sun is the thing that strawberry plants crave.  Watering is a bit trickier.  Container strawberry plants need frequent, light watering.  Overwatering can lead to root rot but insufficient watering will cause the plants to sizzle in all that sunlight.  Frequent watering a little bit at a time is the way to go.

Second only to strawberries in the container fruit garden hall of fame is the blueberry bush.  Blueberry plants will grow larger and more product each year for several seasons.

Read the full article: Little Bit of Green

How to Select Fruit and Nut Trees (Mother Earth

Read at :

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Organic-Gardening/Fruit-Trees-Nut-Trees.aspx?utm_content=10.23.09+FG&utm_campaign=FG&utm_source=iPost&utm_medium=email

How to Select Fruit and Nut Trees

Whether you purchase trees and shrubs from a local nursery or from a mail-order company, this expert advice will help ensure that your plants are healthy and happy in their new home.

The following is an excerpt from Landscaping with Fruit by Lee Reich, Ph.D. (Storey, 2009). Reich is an author, lecturer and consultant whose books also include The Pruning Book, Weedless Gardening and Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden. Reich grows a broad assortment of fruit plants in his own garden, which has been featured in numerous publications. Whether you purchase trees and shrubs from a local nursery or from a mail-order company, this expert advice will help ensure that your plants are healthy and happy in their new home.

All your efforts to give your plant the best possible care are for naught if you don’t start out with the best possible plant. The best way to get such a plant is to purchase it from a reputable nursery. Look for a plant whose tops are no more than three times the size of the roots, and whose roots look healthy, plump and neither congested nor sparse. The stems should be plump, and without dark, sunken areas or rot that could indicate disease.

Nursery plants can come potted, bare root or, less commonly, balled-and-burlapped. My preference is for either of the first two. Such plants can be shipped — and so are available in the widest selection — and root damage is less likely to occur between the nursery and your yard. Balled-and-burlapped plants are heavy and any fracturing of the soil also tears some roots. The size at which a plant can be taken out of the soil bare root and then replanted successfully is obviously limited, usually to 4 or 5 feet in height, but that’s a very reasonable size for planting. Watch out for potted plants that have spent so long in their containers that their roots do nothing more than grow in circles — something that continues after the plant is put in the ground, resulting in self-strangulation. Slide a potted plant out of its pot and examine the roots if possible.

Restrain yourself from always seeking out the largest possible plant in an effort to get the quickest landscape effect and harvest. Larger plants, if bare root or balled-and-burlapped, lose proportionally more roots in transplanting than do smaller plants, so suffer greater shock and need more care — mostly watering — for longer. Even a large, potted plant takes longer before enough roots explore surrounding soil to make the plant self-sufficient. Recent research has demonstrated that initially smaller plants, because they suffer less transplant shock and establish more quickly, often overtake their initially larger counterparts after a few years.

(continued)