10,000 Gardens in Africa

Photo credit: Food Tank

All community members are given opportunity to learn, and engage with food through Slow Food project, 10,000 Gardens in Africa.
Slow Food London

Let’s Get Growing: 10,000 Gardens in Africa

Approximately three out of every four Africans are 25 years of age or younger. Many of these individuals are also food insecure, with roughly a quarter of the estimated 842 million chronically hungry people in the world living in Africa. The Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity has re-launched a project aiming to engage these youth in sustainable food and agriculture systems.

Originally started as one of their main projects in 2012, the project created 1,000 gardens over two years in schools, communities, and urban outskirts in 30 African countries. In 2014, this initiative became the 10,000 Gardens in Africa campaign, with the objective of creating 10,000 gardens across the continent, and the mobilization of a network of young African leaders dedicated to preserving biodiversity, traditional knowledge and food culture, and small-scale agriculture. Here are seven reasons why you should know about the 10,000 Gardens in Africa project.

Read the full article: Food Tank

Healthy gardening that can take place indoors on an office desk or a living room table

 

Houseplants add beauty, health to home and office

Bright light streams through huge windows at a low winter angle as Aj Ewing kneels down and carefully studies the undersides of shiny green leaves at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.

Through the glass, two fat robins watch the activities from perches on leafless shrubs filled with red berries. Ewing uses a small metal magnifying glass, which he keeps on his keychain, to search for insects. He discovers a pest called scale, which he starts to methodically remove by hand.

The plant is in the Center for Sustainable Landscapes on the Phipps campus. It’s one of the greenest buildings in the world. One floor is filled with cubicles, each one surrounded by a plethora of houseplants. They help keep the air clean with two plants placed every 10 square feet in the office area.

It’s the type of healthy gardening that can take place indoors on an office desk or a living room table.

Ewing cites a NASA study and the book “How to Grow Fresh Air” by B.C. Wolverton as the sources Phipps used to create a list of plants that are best for air purification.

“When it comes down to it,” he says frankly, “all plants are clean-air plants in that through the photosynthetic process, they help to clean and filter air.”

The key, he says, is to find a plant that will thrive in your own indoor space.

Read the full story: TribLive

Chillis in pots

Photo credit: The Telegraph

CHILLIES CAN MAKE A BIG IMPACT FOR GARDENERS SHORT ON SPACE

CREDIT: ALAMY

 

How to grow chillis in pots

by 

With their bright fruit and lush, glossy leaves, chillies are perfect for bringing a touch of the tropics to the garden and, whether they’re edible varieties or not, work brilliantly in combination with other plants.

Add them to a hot sunny border once frosts have passed and they are the perfect companion to late summer perennials such as golden rudbeckias, rich red monardas and sunny heleniums, as well as more tender plants like dahliascannas and cosmos.

Read the full story: The Telegraph

 

The true benefits of plants

 

 

15 Flowering Foliage And Tropical Plants For The Home And Garden

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Flowering foliage and tropical plants make great home décor items for today’s consumers. They are the ultimate lifestyle plants because they enrich the environment and provide mood-boosting benefits. And with all the new varieties available, flowering tropical and foliage plants have uses that go beyond the confines of the home. They make great patio and outdoor garden items, as well. Take into account some of these new introductions for a crop mix that helps your customers realize the true benefits of plants.

Outdoor Christmas Decorations

Photo credit: Balcony Garden Web

If you have a fence at the entrance of your home or a door, tie Christmas wreaths and red ribbons there.

Christmas Garden Decoration Ideas | Outdoor Christmas Decorations

At this wonderful time of the year when Christmas comes, the faces of the children lit with enthusiasm, the atmosphere becomes magical and lively. Every corner of the home dress up for Christmas and sings the song of happiness, on such a time we bring you some tips for Christmas garden decoration ideas.

Read the full article: Balcony Garden Web

Teaching Families to Grow Own Food

Photo credit: WFMY

The Jamestown Farmer’s Market is looking for donations of gardening tools as it starts a new non-profit.

Jamestown Farmer’s Market Teaching Families to Grow Own Food

Meghann Mollerus, WFMY

The Jamestown Farmer’s Market’s new non-profit program aims to teach families how to grow their own food. The goal? To alleviate food deserts by capitalizing on a growing trend — container gardening.

“We are going to teach them to grow a garden from scratch,” said Jamestown Farmer’s Market employee Laura Simpson. “They could do a little square in their yard and put something on vines.”

The Jamestown Farmer’s Market opened in April 2015 and shortly after began the process of obtaining a 501(c)3. Market owner Deborah Mitchell said she recognized the need for families to learn home growing skills and saw it as a means of helping alleviate food deserts in the area.

So, the Jamestown Agriculture and Educational Junction — certified by the NC Dept. of Agriculture — will launch early next year, with classes beginning Jan. 25, 2015. Sign up by e-mailing: thejamestownmarket@aol.com, visiting The Jamestown Farmer’s Market’s Facebook page or visiting The Jamestown Farmer’s Market in person on E. Main St. in Jamestown (next to Potent Potables).

Read the full article: WFMY News2

Herbs are among the most useful plants

Photo credit: The Daily Progress – http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/dailyprogress.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/d1/9d15fedd-0c4d-5ad5-9d56-f92fbdd3704b/5660e814d4d70.image.jpg?resize=671%2C760

Gardening: From flavors to fragrances to cures, herbs deliver

Herbs are among the most useful plants in nature. They deliver flowers, flavors, fragrances and cures. They’re also good for repelling deer, attracting pollinators, clearing the air, freshening your breath and concocting beauty treatments.

Most are easy to grow, indoors or out. Herbs don’t require much space, and many thrive in dry conditions.

“These are really multi-purpose plants,” said Sue Goetz of Tacoma, Washington, author of “The Herb Lover’s Spa Book” (St. Lynn’s Press. 2015). “There is no other plant category with so much diversity.”

Herbs probably are best known for their culinary qualities, but using them for fragrance has captivated gardeners for thousands of years.

“Plant extracts were used in bathing, and for scenting and cleansing linens and clothes, the floors of homes, tiles, tents, horses and even the sails of ships,” Goetz said. “In Elizabethan times, aromatic herb waters and cut stems of plants were sprinkled on floors to mask unpleasant odors.”

There are more than 100 different herbs from which to choose. It all depends on what you want from them.

Read the full article: The Daily Progress