The Container Gardening Ambassadors (the Fresh Food Home Guards)

All we need is your free moral support to make this world better

by Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem (University of Ghent, Belgium)

Become a member of our container gardening group by clicking the ‘JOIN’ button at https://www.facebook.com/groups/221343224576801/  

(today almost 43.000 members).

Here are some of your trumps

Bottle towers with vegetables and herbs - Photo WVC P 1070455 - Video https://youtu.be/HuykRRspWOY.
Bottle towers with vegetables and herbs – Photo WVC P 1070455 – Video https://youtu.be/HuykRRspWOY.

1. If we show how to build a bottle tower <http://youtu.be/-uDbjZ9roEQ> to all the schoolchildren of this world and teach them how to grow some vegetables and herbs at school, they will enjoy building more towers for their family at home.

Riser with vegetables and herbs growing in recycled bottles - Photo Jojo ROM (The Philippines)  56269_1483085875405_1181604134_31159685_1301366_o.jpg
Riser with vegetables and herbs growing in recycled bottles – Photo Jojo ROM (The Philippines) 56269_1483085875405_1181604134_31159685_1301366_o.jpg

2. If we alleviate child malnutrition in our countries by teaching them container gardening at school, recycling all discarded containers in school gardens, e.g. on risers (see

video https://youtu.be/l7o_5UKIKTo

and <http://www.facebook.com/willemvancotthem>),

there will be sufficient food for decent daily meals and a cleaner environment.

And soon there will be fresh food galore everywhere.

Dwarf orange fruit trees grown in pots - Photo Container Growing - .jpg
Dwarf orange fruit trees grown in pots – Photo Container Growing – .jpg

3. If we convince all young mothers to plant only one fruit tree for every newborn baby and if we plant a fruit tree for every dear family member passing away, we will soon have orchards protecting us against global warming and climate change.

Barrels  cab easily be transformed in vertical gardens with a lot of fresh food - Photo Grow Food, Not Lawns - 542232_449799711742313_474788682_n.jpg
Barrels can easily be transformed in vertical gardens with a lot of fresh food – Photo Grow Food, Not Lawns – 542232_449799711742313_474788682_n.jpg

4. If we pass this message to the world leaders and publish all our photos to show them our green container gardens, it will be a giant convincing step towards a global food revolution.

And soon there will be less hunger because container gardening means solving these major problems at the lowest cost.  People in developing countries have been inventive to grow fresh food in a panoply of containers (pots, buckets, bags, sacks, barrels, …).  There is a lot of indigenous knowledge about best practices and success stories in food production. It is our moral duty to follow their examples and invest in large-scale application of their methods and techniques.  International organizations should reach hands with NGOs to ban hunger and malnutrition without any delay.  They should start in all the schools.

Let us put an important step towards a better future today:

JOIN THE GROUP OF CONTAINER GARDENING AMBASSADORS.  They are the Fresh Food Home Guards !

IT IS TOTALLY FREE : https://www.facebook.com/groups/221343224576801/ 

Recycling planters

Photo credit: Quickcrop

Old tins work just as well for growing herbs. How’s that for recycling.

Urban Planters / Container Gardening for vegetable growers. An image blog post.

A series of pictures.

Wooden Wine Boxes make great little planters for herbs and salads. - https://www.quickcrop.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Wine-box-planter-salad-garden-300x300.jpg
Wooden Wine Boxes make great little planters for herbs and salads. – https://www.quickcrop.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Wine-box-planter-salad-garden-300×300.jpg

See the text: Quickcrop

Kits for beginners

Photo credit: Quickcrop

Beginners Vegetable Garden Kits

https://www.quickcrop.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/grow-carrots-in-containers-300x300.jpg
https://www.quickcrop.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/grow-carrots-in-containers-300×300.jpg

Vegetable gardening can be a little intimidating to the beginner and it is hard to know where to start with all the various information flying around. Our new beginners garden kits were designed to include everything you need to start growing your own vegetables. They include easy to grow vegetable seeds with an appropriately sized planter or growbag and enough soil to fill it. These vegetable growing kits are the perfect start to growing your own as they are reusable, portable and easy to grow in.

When starting a vegetable garden you don’t need to spend a fortune and jump in at the deep end, our beginners kits are great entry level kits as they are affordable and very straightforward to use. They can be placed anywhere you have a bit of space, on patios, balconies, by the back door, or anywhere in the garden.

 

Read the full article: Quickcrop

Rooftop gardens could grow three quarters of city’s vegetables

Photo credit: Minna Takkala

URBAN FARMING GROWING TREND

by MINNA TAKALA – TREND EXPLORER

According to a recent study by EU rooftop gardens could grow three quarters of city’s vegetables. In recent years urban gardening, agriculture and farming have been growing globally. The Dalston Eastern Curve Garden is a good example of community garden program that has turned into a vibrant resource for the local community.

The Dalston Eastern Curve Garden was originally an overgrown, abandoned piece of railway land used as an unofficial landfill site. It received funding from London Development Agency and was finalised in eight month during 2010. Important aspects of the project was to provide opportunities for volunteers and its design and construction offered apprenticeship schemes for local people. It has won awards like Hackney Design Award 2010, Sustain Magazine 2010 Winner – Public Realm, Commended London Planning Awards 2010 – Community Scale Project.

Read the full article: Minna-Takkala

A display of colourful summer bulbs and tubers

Photo credit: Langley Advance

Langley gardening: Container options provide lasting colour 

by Anne Marrison

When container spring bulbs are over and stored away or planted out in the garden, the vacant pots they left are a chance for a heart-gladdening display of colourful summer bulbs and tubers.
Some, such as begonias and dahlias flower repeatedly once they start while others such as acidanthera and Pineapple Lily keep blooming for many weeks.
Agapanthus is not outstandingly long-flowered at first, but its usually blue blooms are spectacular and their tall seedheads are pretty in winter vases.
When it’s kept happy with rich feeding, water and bonemeal, its tubers increase into large masses which in time produce masses of blooms. Agapanthus is well-suited to containers because it well-tolerates being potbound. But all the evergreen kinds are tender, and should be taken inside for winter.
There are hardier deciduous amaryllis but the variety I grew was much smaller than evergreen amaryllis but hardy overwinter in zone 7. My experience was with Cally Hardy mix (seed from http://www.chilternseeds.co.uk).
Containers are very suitable for slug-prone plants because it’s easy to wrap some copper slug tape around the pot, and they’re safe for a couple of seasons. That’s why aside from their huge range of colours and shapes, the smaller type containerized dahlias are carefree as well as gladsome once they start blooming.

Read the full article: Langley Advance

 

Novel “potscaping” ideas

Photo credit: Montreal Gazette

Mireille Dubuc at the Botanical Garden: she replaces or at least refreshes her flower pots several times as the growing season progresses.

Marie-France Coallier / Montreal Gazette

Beyond geraniums: the flowerpot gets a makeover

Susan Semenak, Montreal Gazette
Susan Semenak, Montreal Gazette

by Susan Semenak, Montreal Gazette

Geraniums have taken over the balcony. There they are in window boxes, urns and terra cotta pots. In garden beds and patio planters.

According to Agriculture Canada, the ruffly leafed annuals are the main variety of potted plant produced in Canadian greenhouses (followed by poinsettias and chrysanthemums.)

It’s no wonder. They  are easy-to-grow, drought-tolerant, happy-coloured and for sale just about everywhere at planting time. But pelargoniums, as they are horticulturally known,  aren’t the only flowers that can spruce up the front entrance.

For inspiration, we brainstormed with three horticultural and design experts and came up with a few novel “potscaping” ideas. Some even include a geranium or two.

Read the full article: Montreal Gazette

Go vertical

Photo credit: Vertical garden – Photo Jamie’s Garden Shop – 954693_615794005099659_1861047914_n copy.jpg

Gardening: Get out of your horizontal trench, plant a vertical garden

By LYNN JACKSON KIRK

In this earlier exhibit, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s vertical display of orchids relied on plant-friendly felt pockets sewn by Director of Horticulture Grace Chapman and volunteers - http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/richmond.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0af38d-42d4-58d1-8bf6-4e956e259abe/554d1524a8ba4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450
In this earlier exhibit, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s vertical display of orchids relied on plant-friendly felt pockets sewn by Director of Horticulture Grace Chapman and volunteers – http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/richmond.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0af38d-42d4-58d1-8bf6-4e956e259abe/554d1524a8ba4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450

 

Plant walls, 3-D gardens, micro gardens. Whatever you call them, vertical gardens are all these and more. Unlike traditional in-ground garden beds that typically follow horizontal planes, vertical gardens grow to new heights — and new lows — by reaching up, cascading down or layering plants.

Scotty Guinn Dilworth, a Richmond horticulturist and owner of SG Designs, became intrigued with vertical gardens 12 years ago while living in California. Now, Dilworth considers this art form her niche for making an impact in central Virginia gardens.

“A vertical garden is living art that enhances small spaces,” making them ideal for intimate and enclosed areas, Dilworth said. “Richmond has a lot of interesting neighborhoods like the Fan and Carytown that don’t have a lot of green space, so vertical gardening is one way to have plants without multiple containers that take up a footprint.”

Read the full article: Richmond Times-Dispatch